Promoting articulated action from diverse stakeholders in response to public policy scenarios: a case analysis of the use of ‘scenario improvisation’ method

George Cairns, George Wright, Peter Fairbrother

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    15 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    In this paper we present a novel application of scenario methods to engage a diverse constituency of senior stakeholders, with limited time availability, in debate to inform planning and policy development. Our case study project explores post-carbon futures for the Latrobe Valley region of the Australian state of Victoria. Our approach involved initial deductive development of two ‘extreme scenarios’ by a multi-disciplinary research team, based upon an extensive research program. Over four workshops with the stakeholder constituency, these initial scenarios were discussed, challenged, refined and expanded through an inductive process, whereby participants took ‘ownership’ of a final set of three scenarios. These were both comfortable and challenging to them. The outcomes of this process subsequently informed public policy development for the region. Whilst this process did not follow a single extant structured, multi-stage scenario approach, neither was it devoid of form. Here, we seek to theorise and codify elements of our process – which we term ‘scenario improvisation’ – such that others may adopt it.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages97-108
    Number of pages12
    JournalTechnological Forecasting and Social Change
    Volume103
    Early online date28 Nov 2015
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2016

    Fingerprint

    Policy Making
    Public Policy
    Victoria
    Ownership
    Research
    Carbon
    Availability
    Education
    Planning
    Scenarios
    Case analysis
    Improvisation
    Stakeholders
    Public policy
    Policy development

    Keywords

    • scenario method
    • stakeholders
    • improvisation
    • reframing
    • policy

    Cite this

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    abstract = "In this paper we present a novel application of scenario methods to engage a diverse constituency of senior stakeholders, with limited time availability, in debate to inform planning and policy development. Our case study project explores post-carbon futures for the Latrobe Valley region of the Australian state of Victoria. Our approach involved initial deductive development of two ‘extreme scenarios’ by a multi-disciplinary research team, based upon an extensive research program. Over four workshops with the stakeholder constituency, these initial scenarios were discussed, challenged, refined and expanded through an inductive process, whereby participants took ‘ownership’ of a final set of three scenarios. These were both comfortable and challenging to them. The outcomes of this process subsequently informed public policy development for the region. Whilst this process did not follow a single extant structured, multi-stage scenario approach, neither was it devoid of form. Here, we seek to theorise and codify elements of our process – which we term ‘scenario improvisation’ – such that others may adopt it.",
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