Predicting university undergraduates' binge-drinking behavior: a comparative test of the one- and two-component theories of planned behavior

Mark Elliott, Kirsty Ainsworth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study provides a comparative test of the one- and two-component theories of planned behavior (TPB) in the context of university undergraduates’ binge-drinking. Participants (N=120) self-completed questionnaire measures of all TPB constructs at time 1 and subsequent binge-drinking at time 2 (two-weeks later). The data were analyzed using a combination of path analyses and bootstrapping procedures. Both models accounted for a substantial proportion of the variation in behavior. However, the two-component TPB provided a significantly better fit to the data, with the total direct and indirect effects accounting for 90% of the variance. Intention was the only direct predictor of behavior. Instrumental attitude, affective attitude and self-efficacy had indirect effects. Although health interventions could usefully target these cognitive antecedents, simulation analyses, modelling the effects of cognition change on behavior, showed that only large- (0.8 SD) sized changes to affective attitude, or moderate-sized changes to all of these cognitions in combination were sufficient to reduce binge-drinking.
LanguageEnglish
Pages92-101
Number of pages10
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume37
Issue number1
Early online date8 Sep 2011
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2012

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Binge Drinking
Drinking Behavior
Health
Computer simulation
Cognition
Self Efficacy

Keywords

  • university students
  • cognition and behavior change
  • binge-drinking
  • two-component theory of planned behavior

Cite this

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Predicting university undergraduates' binge-drinking behavior : a comparative test of the one- and two-component theories of planned behavior. / Elliott, Mark; Ainsworth, Kirsty .

In: Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 37, No. 1, 01.2012, p. 92-101.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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