Potential overestimation of community respiration in the western Pacific boundary ocean: what causes the putative net heterotrophy in oligotrophic systems?

Yibin Huang, Bingzhang Chen, Bangqin Huang, Hui Zhou, Yongquan Yuan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Microbial metabolism is of great importance in affecting the efficiency of biological pump and global carbon cycles. However, the metabolic state of the oligotrophic ocean, the largest biome on Earth, remains contentious. We examined the planktonic and bacterial metabolism using in vitro incubations along the western Pacific boundary during September and October 2016. The integrated gross primary production (GPP) of the photic zone exhibited higher values in the region of 2°–8°N along 130°E and the western Luzon Strait, which is consistent with the regional variability of nutrients in the different ocean provinces. Spatially, the community respiration (CR) was less variable than the GPP and slightly exceeded the GPP at most of the sampling stations. Overall, the in vitro incubation results suggest a prevailing heterotrophic state in this region. A comparison of the metabolic rates from the in vitro incubations with recently published biogeochemical model results in the same region shows that our observed GPP values were close to those predicted by the model, but the measured CR was approximately 30% higher than the modeled values. We also found that most of the in vitro CR estimates were higher than the upper range of the empirical CR estimated from the sum of the contributions of the main trophic groups. Conversely, the estimates of the empirical CR support the rationality of the CR predicted by the biogeochemical model. In general, the results indicate that systematic net heterotrophy is more likely a result of the overestimation of CR measured by the light–dark bottle incubation experiments, although the exact cause of the methodological problem remains unknown.

LanguageEnglish
Pages2202-2219
Number of pages18
JournalLimnology and Oceanography
Volume64
Issue number5
Early online date6 May 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 6 May 2019

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heterotrophy
Respiration
Ocean
primary productivity
respiration
oceans
Gross
ocean
primary production
incubation
metabolism
euphotic zone
Metabolism
bottles
pumps
biological pump
photic zone
Rationality
biome
Community

Keywords

  • gross primary production
  • community respiration
  • net community production
  • bacterial production
  • Western Pacific ocean
  • metabolic state

Cite this

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title = "Potential overestimation of community respiration in the western Pacific boundary ocean: what causes the putative net heterotrophy in oligotrophic systems?",
abstract = "Microbial metabolism is of great importance in affecting the efficiency of biological pump and global carbon cycles. However, the metabolic state of the oligotrophic ocean, the largest biome on Earth, remains contentious. We examined the planktonic and bacterial metabolism using in vitro incubations along the western Pacific boundary during September and October 2016. The integrated gross primary production (GPP) of the photic zone exhibited higher values in the region of 2°–8°N along 130°E and the western Luzon Strait, which is consistent with the regional variability of nutrients in the different ocean provinces. Spatially, the community respiration (CR) was less variable than the GPP and slightly exceeded the GPP at most of the sampling stations. Overall, the in vitro incubation results suggest a prevailing heterotrophic state in this region. A comparison of the metabolic rates from the in vitro incubations with recently published biogeochemical model results in the same region shows that our observed GPP values were close to those predicted by the model, but the measured CR was approximately 30{\%} higher than the modeled values. We also found that most of the in vitro CR estimates were higher than the upper range of the empirical CR estimated from the sum of the contributions of the main trophic groups. Conversely, the estimates of the empirical CR support the rationality of the CR predicted by the biogeochemical model. In general, the results indicate that systematic net heterotrophy is more likely a result of the overestimation of CR measured by the light–dark bottle incubation experiments, although the exact cause of the methodological problem remains unknown.",
keywords = "gross primary production, community respiration, net community production, bacterial production, Western Pacific ocean, metabolic state",
author = "Yibin Huang and Bingzhang Chen and Bangqin Huang and Hui Zhou and Yongquan Yuan",
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Potential overestimation of community respiration in the western Pacific boundary ocean : what causes the putative net heterotrophy in oligotrophic systems? / Huang, Yibin; Chen, Bingzhang; Huang, Bangqin; Zhou, Hui; Yuan, Yongquan.

In: Limnology and Oceanography , Vol. 64, No. 5, 06.05.2019, p. 2202-2219.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Potential overestimation of community respiration in the western Pacific boundary ocean

T2 - Limnology and Oceanography

AU - Huang, Yibin

AU - Chen, Bingzhang

AU - Huang, Bangqin

AU - Zhou, Hui

AU - Yuan, Yongquan

N1 - This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Huang, Y, Chen, B, Huang, B, Zhou, H & Yuan, Y 2019, 'Potential overestimation of community respiration in the western Pacific boundary ocean: what causes the putative net heterotrophy in oligotrophic systems?' Limnology and Oceanography, pp. 1-18., which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1002/lno.11179. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.

PY - 2019/5/6

Y1 - 2019/5/6

N2 - Microbial metabolism is of great importance in affecting the efficiency of biological pump and global carbon cycles. However, the metabolic state of the oligotrophic ocean, the largest biome on Earth, remains contentious. We examined the planktonic and bacterial metabolism using in vitro incubations along the western Pacific boundary during September and October 2016. The integrated gross primary production (GPP) of the photic zone exhibited higher values in the region of 2°–8°N along 130°E and the western Luzon Strait, which is consistent with the regional variability of nutrients in the different ocean provinces. Spatially, the community respiration (CR) was less variable than the GPP and slightly exceeded the GPP at most of the sampling stations. Overall, the in vitro incubation results suggest a prevailing heterotrophic state in this region. A comparison of the metabolic rates from the in vitro incubations with recently published biogeochemical model results in the same region shows that our observed GPP values were close to those predicted by the model, but the measured CR was approximately 30% higher than the modeled values. We also found that most of the in vitro CR estimates were higher than the upper range of the empirical CR estimated from the sum of the contributions of the main trophic groups. Conversely, the estimates of the empirical CR support the rationality of the CR predicted by the biogeochemical model. In general, the results indicate that systematic net heterotrophy is more likely a result of the overestimation of CR measured by the light–dark bottle incubation experiments, although the exact cause of the methodological problem remains unknown.

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KW - gross primary production

KW - community respiration

KW - net community production

KW - bacterial production

KW - Western Pacific ocean

KW - metabolic state

UR - https://aslopubs.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/19395590

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