Possessed Victorians: Extra Spheres in Nineteenth-Century Mystical Writings [review]

Research output: Contribution to journalBook/Film/Article review

Abstract

This lively and important study opens on a vision seen by a 'sister in the New Life', a Swedenborgian cult. This 'sister' recounts the formation of a new community in which fairies or 'fays' can 'move into a person's breast . . .[and] then clearing a space . . . begin to build their house' after which 'little baby fays would be born' (p. 1).Willburn traces connections between these and other such apparently marginal and eccentric practicesçastral travel, table-rapping, mediumshipçand the models of individual selfhood found in liberal political theory and in the Victorian novel. Her study builds on a growing body of scholarship that reveals the widespread in£uence of occult practices on Victorian imaginings of community.
LanguageEnglish
Pages752-753
Number of pages1
JournalReview of English Studies
Volume58
Issue number237
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2007

Fingerprint

nineteenth century
political theory
ritual
baby
community
travel
human being
Mystic
Victorian Era
Sister
Fairies
Victorian Novel
Selfhood
Person
Imagining
Political Theory
Cult

Keywords

  • English literature
  • Victorian
  • 19th century
  • mystical
  • writing

Cite this

@article{7587c3aab725447db646364a3f4a52ac,
title = "Possessed Victorians: Extra Spheres in Nineteenth-Century Mystical Writings [review]",
abstract = "This lively and important study opens on a vision seen by a 'sister in the New Life', a Swedenborgian cult. This 'sister' recounts the formation of a new community in which fairies or 'fays' can 'move into a person's breast . . .[and] then clearing a space . . . begin to build their house' after which 'little baby fays would be born' (p. 1).Willburn traces connections between these and other such apparently marginal and eccentric practices{\cc}astral travel, table-rapping, mediumship{\cc}and the models of individual selfhood found in liberal political theory and in the Victorian novel. Her study builds on a growing body of scholarship that reveals the widespread in£uence of occult practices on Victorian imaginings of community.",
keywords = "English literature, Victorian, 19th century, mystical, writing",
author = "S.M. Edwards",
note = "This article is a review of {"}Possessed Victorians: Extra Spheres in Nineteenth-Century Mystical Writings{"} by Sarah A. Willburn. Pp. xii + 170 (The Nineteenth Century Series). Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing, 2006.",
year = "2007",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1093/res/hgm120",
language = "English",
volume = "58",
pages = "752--753",
journal = "Review of English Studies",
issn = "0034-6551",
number = "237",

}

Possessed Victorians : Extra Spheres in Nineteenth-Century Mystical Writings [review]. / Edwards, S.M.

In: Review of English Studies , Vol. 58, No. 237, 11.2007, p. 752-753.

Research output: Contribution to journalBook/Film/Article review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Possessed Victorians

T2 - Review of English Studies

AU - Edwards, S.M.

N1 - This article is a review of "Possessed Victorians: Extra Spheres in Nineteenth-Century Mystical Writings" by Sarah A. Willburn. Pp. xii + 170 (The Nineteenth Century Series). Aldershot: Ashgate Publishing, 2006.

PY - 2007/11

Y1 - 2007/11

N2 - This lively and important study opens on a vision seen by a 'sister in the New Life', a Swedenborgian cult. This 'sister' recounts the formation of a new community in which fairies or 'fays' can 'move into a person's breast . . .[and] then clearing a space . . . begin to build their house' after which 'little baby fays would be born' (p. 1).Willburn traces connections between these and other such apparently marginal and eccentric practicesçastral travel, table-rapping, mediumshipçand the models of individual selfhood found in liberal political theory and in the Victorian novel. Her study builds on a growing body of scholarship that reveals the widespread in£uence of occult practices on Victorian imaginings of community.

AB - This lively and important study opens on a vision seen by a 'sister in the New Life', a Swedenborgian cult. This 'sister' recounts the formation of a new community in which fairies or 'fays' can 'move into a person's breast . . .[and] then clearing a space . . . begin to build their house' after which 'little baby fays would be born' (p. 1).Willburn traces connections between these and other such apparently marginal and eccentric practicesçastral travel, table-rapping, mediumshipçand the models of individual selfhood found in liberal political theory and in the Victorian novel. Her study builds on a growing body of scholarship that reveals the widespread in£uence of occult practices on Victorian imaginings of community.

KW - English literature

KW - Victorian

KW - 19th century

KW - mystical

KW - writing

UR - http://res.oxfordjournals.org/

U2 - 10.1093/res/hgm120

DO - 10.1093/res/hgm120

M3 - Book/Film/Article review

VL - 58

SP - 752

EP - 753

JO - Review of English Studies

JF - Review of English Studies

SN - 0034-6551

IS - 237

ER -