Plasma kinetic effects of nitrogen and hydrogen addition to carbon-monoxide laser discharges

G.A. Murray, A.L.S. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The effects of the additive gases nitrogen and hydrogen on the gain, electron density, discharge voltage and positive-ion spectra of the plasmas of room-temperature sealed-off CO-He-Xe gas laser mixtures have been examined. Hydrogen affects the electron kinetics little, but its addition is always detrimental because the vibrationally excited CO is relaxed by V-T collisions. The effect of nitrogen is more complex; there is a beneficial CO-N2 vibrational pumping channel and a detrimental effect due to increased discharge voltage and hence gas heating. It is not a necessary additive for high-power laser operation.
LanguageEnglish
Pages2125-2133
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Physics D: Applied Physics
Volume15
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1982

Fingerprint

carbon monoxide lasers
Carbon Monoxide
Carbon monoxide
Discharge (fluid mechanics)
Hydrogen
Nitrogen
Gas heating
Plasmas
nitrogen
Gas lasers
Kinetics
Lasers
High power lasers
kinetics
Electric potential
hydrogen
Carrier concentration
Positive ions
Electrons
gas lasers

Keywords

  • electric discharges
  • gas lasers
  • rotational and vibrational energy transfer
  • plasmas

Cite this

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abstract = "The effects of the additive gases nitrogen and hydrogen on the gain, electron density, discharge voltage and positive-ion spectra of the plasmas of room-temperature sealed-off CO-He-Xe gas laser mixtures have been examined. Hydrogen affects the electron kinetics little, but its addition is always detrimental because the vibrationally excited CO is relaxed by V-T collisions. The effect of nitrogen is more complex; there is a beneficial CO-N2 vibrational pumping channel and a detrimental effect due to increased discharge voltage and hence gas heating. It is not a necessary additive for high-power laser operation.",
keywords = "electric discharges, gas lasers, rotational and vibrational energy transfer, plasmas",
author = "G.A. Murray and A.L.S. Smith",
year = "1982",
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language = "English",
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pages = "2125--2133",
journal = "Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics",
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Plasma kinetic effects of nitrogen and hydrogen addition to carbon-monoxide laser discharges. / Murray, G.A.; Smith, A.L.S.

In: Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics, Vol. 15, No. 11, 1982, p. 2125-2133.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Plasma kinetic effects of nitrogen and hydrogen addition to carbon-monoxide laser discharges

AU - Murray, G.A.

AU - Smith, A.L.S.

PY - 1982

Y1 - 1982

N2 - The effects of the additive gases nitrogen and hydrogen on the gain, electron density, discharge voltage and positive-ion spectra of the plasmas of room-temperature sealed-off CO-He-Xe gas laser mixtures have been examined. Hydrogen affects the electron kinetics little, but its addition is always detrimental because the vibrationally excited CO is relaxed by V-T collisions. The effect of nitrogen is more complex; there is a beneficial CO-N2 vibrational pumping channel and a detrimental effect due to increased discharge voltage and hence gas heating. It is not a necessary additive for high-power laser operation.

AB - The effects of the additive gases nitrogen and hydrogen on the gain, electron density, discharge voltage and positive-ion spectra of the plasmas of room-temperature sealed-off CO-He-Xe gas laser mixtures have been examined. Hydrogen affects the electron kinetics little, but its addition is always detrimental because the vibrationally excited CO is relaxed by V-T collisions. The effect of nitrogen is more complex; there is a beneficial CO-N2 vibrational pumping channel and a detrimental effect due to increased discharge voltage and hence gas heating. It is not a necessary additive for high-power laser operation.

KW - electric discharges

KW - gas lasers

KW - rotational and vibrational energy transfer

KW - plasmas

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1088/0022-3727/15/11/008

U2 - 10.1088/0022-3727/15/11/008

DO - 10.1088/0022-3727/15/11/008

M3 - Article

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JO - Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics

T2 - Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics

JF - Journal of Physics D: Applied Physics

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IS - 11

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