Physical activity, diet and BMI in children aged 6–8 years: a cross-sectional analysis

Laura Basterfield, Angela Jones, Kathryn N. Parkinson, Jessica Reilly, Mark S. Pearce, John Reilly, Ashley J. Adamson, The Gateshead Millennium Study Core Team

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To assess relationships between current physical activity (PA), dietary intake and body mass index (BMI) in English children. Longitudinal birth cohort study in northeast England, cross-sectional analysis. Participants 425 children (41% of the original cohort) aged 6–8 years (49% boys). Main outcome measures PA over 7 days was measured objectively by an accelerometer; three categories of PA were created: ‘active’ ≥60 min/day moderate-to-vigorous-intensity PA (MVPA); ‘moderately active’ 30–59 min/day MVPA; ‘inactive’ <30 min/day MVPA. Dietary intake over 4 days was measured using a prospective dietary assessment tool which incorporated elements of the food diary and food frequency methods. Three diet categories were created: ‘healthy’, ‘unhealthy’ and ‘mixed’, according to the number of portions of different foods consumed. Adherence to the ‘5-a-day’ recommendations for portions of fruit and vegetables was also assessed. Children were classified as ‘healthy weight’ or ‘overweight or obese’ (OW/OB) according to International Obesity Taskforce cutpoints for BMI. Associations between weight status and PA/diet categories were analysed using logistic regression. Few children met the UK-recommended guidelines for either MVPA or fruit and vegetable intake, with just 7% meeting the recommended amount of MVPA of 60 min/day, and 3% meeting the 5-a-day fruit and vegetable recommendation. Higher PA was associated with a lower OR for OW/OB in boys only (0.20, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.88). There was no association detected between dietary intake and OW/OB in either sex. Increasing MVPA may help to reduce OW/OB in boys; however, more research is required to examine this relationship in girls. Children are not meeting the UK guidelines for diet and PA, and more needs to be done to improve this situation.
LanguageEnglish
Article numbere005001
Number of pages8
JournalBMJ Open
Volume4
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Jun 2014

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Body Mass Index
Cross-Sectional Studies
Exercise
Diet
Vegetables
Fruit
Guidelines
Diet Records
Weights and Measures
Food
England
Cohort Studies
Obesity
Logistic Models
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Parturition
Research

Keywords

  • physical activity
  • dietary intake
  • BMI
  • body mass index
  • children

Cite this

The Gateshead Millennium Study Core Team. / Physical activity, diet and BMI in children aged 6–8 years : a cross-sectional analysis. In: BMJ Open. 2014 ; Vol. 4, No. 6.
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abstract = "Objective To assess relationships between current physical activity (PA), dietary intake and body mass index (BMI) in English children. Longitudinal birth cohort study in northeast England, cross-sectional analysis. Participants 425 children (41{\%} of the original cohort) aged 6–8 years (49{\%} boys). Main outcome measures PA over 7 days was measured objectively by an accelerometer; three categories of PA were created: ‘active’ ≥60 min/day moderate-to-vigorous-intensity PA (MVPA); ‘moderately active’ 30–59 min/day MVPA; ‘inactive’ <30 min/day MVPA. Dietary intake over 4 days was measured using a prospective dietary assessment tool which incorporated elements of the food diary and food frequency methods. Three diet categories were created: ‘healthy’, ‘unhealthy’ and ‘mixed’, according to the number of portions of different foods consumed. Adherence to the ‘5-a-day’ recommendations for portions of fruit and vegetables was also assessed. Children were classified as ‘healthy weight’ or ‘overweight or obese’ (OW/OB) according to International Obesity Taskforce cutpoints for BMI. Associations between weight status and PA/diet categories were analysed using logistic regression. Few children met the UK-recommended guidelines for either MVPA or fruit and vegetable intake, with just 7{\%} meeting the recommended amount of MVPA of 60 min/day, and 3{\%} meeting the 5-a-day fruit and vegetable recommendation. Higher PA was associated with a lower OR for OW/OB in boys only (0.20, 95{\%} CI 0.04 to 0.88). There was no association detected between dietary intake and OW/OB in either sex. Increasing MVPA may help to reduce OW/OB in boys; however, more research is required to examine this relationship in girls. Children are not meeting the UK guidelines for diet and PA, and more needs to be done to improve this situation.",
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Physical activity, diet and BMI in children aged 6–8 years : a cross-sectional analysis. / The Gateshead Millennium Study Core Team.

In: BMJ Open, Vol. 4, No. 6, e005001, 05.06.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Physical activity, diet and BMI in children aged 6–8 years

T2 - BMJ Open

AU - Basterfield, Laura

AU - Jones, Angela

AU - Parkinson, Kathryn N.

AU - Reilly, Jessica

AU - Pearce, Mark S.

AU - Reilly, John

AU - Adamson, Ashley J.

AU - The Gateshead Millennium Study Core Team

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N2 - Objective To assess relationships between current physical activity (PA), dietary intake and body mass index (BMI) in English children. Longitudinal birth cohort study in northeast England, cross-sectional analysis. Participants 425 children (41% of the original cohort) aged 6–8 years (49% boys). Main outcome measures PA over 7 days was measured objectively by an accelerometer; three categories of PA were created: ‘active’ ≥60 min/day moderate-to-vigorous-intensity PA (MVPA); ‘moderately active’ 30–59 min/day MVPA; ‘inactive’ <30 min/day MVPA. Dietary intake over 4 days was measured using a prospective dietary assessment tool which incorporated elements of the food diary and food frequency methods. Three diet categories were created: ‘healthy’, ‘unhealthy’ and ‘mixed’, according to the number of portions of different foods consumed. Adherence to the ‘5-a-day’ recommendations for portions of fruit and vegetables was also assessed. Children were classified as ‘healthy weight’ or ‘overweight or obese’ (OW/OB) according to International Obesity Taskforce cutpoints for BMI. Associations between weight status and PA/diet categories were analysed using logistic regression. Few children met the UK-recommended guidelines for either MVPA or fruit and vegetable intake, with just 7% meeting the recommended amount of MVPA of 60 min/day, and 3% meeting the 5-a-day fruit and vegetable recommendation. Higher PA was associated with a lower OR for OW/OB in boys only (0.20, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.88). There was no association detected between dietary intake and OW/OB in either sex. Increasing MVPA may help to reduce OW/OB in boys; however, more research is required to examine this relationship in girls. Children are not meeting the UK guidelines for diet and PA, and more needs to be done to improve this situation.

AB - Objective To assess relationships between current physical activity (PA), dietary intake and body mass index (BMI) in English children. Longitudinal birth cohort study in northeast England, cross-sectional analysis. Participants 425 children (41% of the original cohort) aged 6–8 years (49% boys). Main outcome measures PA over 7 days was measured objectively by an accelerometer; three categories of PA were created: ‘active’ ≥60 min/day moderate-to-vigorous-intensity PA (MVPA); ‘moderately active’ 30–59 min/day MVPA; ‘inactive’ <30 min/day MVPA. Dietary intake over 4 days was measured using a prospective dietary assessment tool which incorporated elements of the food diary and food frequency methods. Three diet categories were created: ‘healthy’, ‘unhealthy’ and ‘mixed’, according to the number of portions of different foods consumed. Adherence to the ‘5-a-day’ recommendations for portions of fruit and vegetables was also assessed. Children were classified as ‘healthy weight’ or ‘overweight or obese’ (OW/OB) according to International Obesity Taskforce cutpoints for BMI. Associations between weight status and PA/diet categories were analysed using logistic regression. Few children met the UK-recommended guidelines for either MVPA or fruit and vegetable intake, with just 7% meeting the recommended amount of MVPA of 60 min/day, and 3% meeting the 5-a-day fruit and vegetable recommendation. Higher PA was associated with a lower OR for OW/OB in boys only (0.20, 95% CI 0.04 to 0.88). There was no association detected between dietary intake and OW/OB in either sex. Increasing MVPA may help to reduce OW/OB in boys; however, more research is required to examine this relationship in girls. Children are not meeting the UK guidelines for diet and PA, and more needs to be done to improve this situation.

KW - physical activity

KW - dietary intake

KW - BMI

KW - body mass index

KW - children

U2 - 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005001

DO - 10.1136/bmjopen-2014-005001

M3 - Article

VL - 4

JO - BMJ Open

JF - BMJ Open

SN - 2044-6055

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