Performing whiteness: Central and Eastern European young people's experiences of xenophobia and racialisation in the UK post-Brexit

Daniela Sime, Naomi Tyrrell, Emmaleena Käkelä, Marta Moskal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)
30 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The state-induced anti-immigration environment and the normalisation of xenophobia in political and media discourses have led to the increased othering of European migrants in the UK through new forms of social stratification, especially since the Brexit Referendum of 2016. For young people who migrated to the UK as children from Central and Eastern Europe, Brexit has represented a major rupture in the process of their identity formation, adding new insecurities in the context of increasingly uncertain rights. Based on a survey with 1,120 young people aged 12–18 who identified as Central or Eastern European migrants, followed by focus groups and case studies, we report on young migrants’ everyday experiences of xenophobia and racialisation. We explore the coping and resistance strategies young people used to integrate themselves in these racialized hierarchies. Drawing on insights from emergent theories of racialisation and whiteness, we add new evidence on the direct consequences of these experiences of marginalisation on young people’s sense of belonging and their own attitudes towards other ethnic groups.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)4527-4546
Number of pages20
JournalJournal of Ethnic and Migration Studies
Volume48
Issue number19
Early online date17 Jun 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Nov 2022

Keywords

  • Brexit
  • migrant young people
  • race
  • whiteness
  • migration
  • xenophobia
  • schools
  • Eastern Europe
  • Central and Eastern Europe

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Performing whiteness: Central and Eastern European young people's experiences of xenophobia and racialisation in the UK post-Brexit'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this