Penal identities in Russian prison colonies

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article explores imprisonment in contemporary Russia. Throughout the 20th century prisoners were central to the maintenance of the Soviet Union through forced labour and political correction that operated within a centralized system of management. It is argued that since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, no generally accepted penal ideology has emerged to replace Marxism/Leninism and the function of imprisonment in Russia in the early 21st century is thus unresolved. Findings gathered from four prison colonies in Smolensk, western Russia and in Omsk, Siberia show that rehabilitation is the most widely claimed task of imprisonment, but that practices undertaken in its name vary sharply. The contemporary penal practices have been characterized as new 'Penal Identities'. The specific nature of these identities is explained as a consequence of several developments: the decline of prison work, the location of the regions in relation to the central prison authority and the permeability of the prison system to western influences.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)131-147
Number of pages16
JournalPunishment and Society
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

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correctional institution
imprisonment
Russia
USSR
Marxism-Leninism
forced labor
Siberia
permeability
prisoner
rehabilitation
ideology
management

Keywords

  • prison
  • russia
  • criminal law
  • penal system

Cite this

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Penal identities in Russian prison colonies. / Piacentini, L.F.

In: Punishment and Society, Vol. 6, No. 2, 2004, p. 131-147.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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