Partitioning the apparent temperature sensitivity into within and across-taxa responses: revisiting the difference between autotrophic and heterotrophic protists

Bingzhang Chen, David Montagnes, Qing Wang, Hongbin Liu, Susanne Menden-Deuer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
9 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Conventional analyses suggest that the metabolism of heterotrophs is thermally more sensitive than that of autotrophs, implying that warming leads to pronounced trophodynamic imbalances. However, these analyses inappropriately combine within- and across taxa trends. Our new analysis separates these, revealing that 92% of the difference in the apparent thermal sensitivity between autotrophic and heterotrophic protists does indeed arise from within-taxa responses. Fitness differences among taxa adapted to different temperature regimes only partially compensate for the positive biochemical relationship between temperature and growth rate within taxa, supporting the hotter-is-partially-better hypothesis. Our work highlights the importance of separating within- and across-taxa responses when comparing temperature sensitivities between groups, which is relevant to how trophic imbalances and carbon fluxes respond to warming.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)610-618
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Naturalist
Volume201
Issue number4
Early online date25 Jan 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2023

Keywords

  • activation energy
  • protist
  • thermal adaptation
  • thermal diversity
  • warming

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