Participation, reflection and integration for business and lifelong learning : pedagogical challenges of the integrative studies programme at the University of Strathclyde Business School

Bill Johnston, Aileen Watson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper gives a succinct account of current debates in the literature on graduate attributes as they are related to employment and lifelong learning, and argues the limitations of a "key skills" agenda as a guide to curriculum practice. Development of a curricular innovation that addresses key skills, "integrative studies" at the Strathclyde University Business School, is described and located in a wider framework of work-related facets that extend thinking beyond key skills. Those facets include the idea of a learning organisation and the concept of student identity formation. A research-based approach to further development of the curriculum is outlined, which takes the experiences of students and the perceptions and practices of specific employers to be key influences.
LanguageEnglish
Pages53-62
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Workplace Learning
Volume16
Issue number1/2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

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study program
business school
lifelong learning
curriculum
Curriculum
student
learning
Learning
Students
participation
identity formation
learning organization
employer
innovation
graduate
Organizations
Research
experience
school
programme

Keywords

  • skills
  • curriculum development
  • learning organizations
  • graduates
  • employment
  • lifelong learning

Cite this

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