Origin and mechanisms of Ca2+ waves in smooth muscle as revealed by localized photolysis of caged inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate

J.G. McCarron, D. MacMillan, K.N. Bradley, S. Chalmers, T.C. Muir

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

The cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c) controls diverse cellular events via various Ca2+ signaling patterns; the latter are influenced by the method of cell activation. Here, in single-voltage clamped smooth muscle cells, sarcolemma depolarization generated uniform increases in [Ca2+]c throughout the cell entirely by Ca2+ influx. On the other hand, the Ca2+ signal produced by InsP3-generating agonists was a propagated wave. Using localized uncaged InsP3, the forward movement of the Ca2+ wave arose from Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release at the InsP3 receptor (InsP3R) without ryanodine receptor involvement. The decline in [Ca2+]c (the back of the wave) occurred from a functional compartmentalization of the store, which rendered the site of InsP3-mediated Ca2+ release, and only this site, refractory to the phosphoinositide. The functional compartmentalization arose by a localized feedback deactivation of InsP3 receptors produced by an increased [Ca2+]c rather than a reduced luminal [Ca2+] or an increased cytoplasmic [InsP3]. The deactivation of the InsP3 receptor was delayed in onset, compared with the time of the rise in [Ca2+]c, persisted (>30 s) even when [Ca2+]c had regained resting levels, and was not prevented by kinase or phosphatase inhibitors. Thus different forms of cell activation generate distinct Ca2+ signaling patterns in smooth muscle. Sarcolemma Ca2+ entry increases [Ca2+]c uniformly; agonists activate InsP3R and produce Ca2+ waves. Waves progress by Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release at InsP3R, and persistent Ca2+-dependent inhibition of InsP3R accounts for the decline in [Ca2+]c at the back of the wave.
LanguageEnglish
Pages8417-8427
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Biological Chemistry
Volume279
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate
Photolysis
Smooth Muscle
Muscle
Sarcolemma
Ryanodine Receptor Calcium Release Channel
Phosphatidylinositols
Phosphoric Monoester Hydrolases
Smooth Muscle Myocytes
Phosphotransferases
Chemical activation
Depolarization
Refractory materials
Cells
Feedback
Electric potential

Keywords

  • smooth muscle
  • photolysis
  • caged inositol
  • trisphosphate

Cite this

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title = "Origin and mechanisms of Ca2+ waves in smooth muscle as revealed by localized photolysis of caged inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate",
abstract = "The cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c) controls diverse cellular events via various Ca2+ signaling patterns; the latter are influenced by the method of cell activation. Here, in single-voltage clamped smooth muscle cells, sarcolemma depolarization generated uniform increases in [Ca2+]c throughout the cell entirely by Ca2+ influx. On the other hand, the Ca2+ signal produced by InsP3-generating agonists was a propagated wave. Using localized uncaged InsP3, the forward movement of the Ca2+ wave arose from Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release at the InsP3 receptor (InsP3R) without ryanodine receptor involvement. The decline in [Ca2+]c (the back of the wave) occurred from a functional compartmentalization of the store, which rendered the site of InsP3-mediated Ca2+ release, and only this site, refractory to the phosphoinositide. The functional compartmentalization arose by a localized feedback deactivation of InsP3 receptors produced by an increased [Ca2+]c rather than a reduced luminal [Ca2+] or an increased cytoplasmic [InsP3]. The deactivation of the InsP3 receptor was delayed in onset, compared with the time of the rise in [Ca2+]c, persisted (>30 s) even when [Ca2+]c had regained resting levels, and was not prevented by kinase or phosphatase inhibitors. Thus different forms of cell activation generate distinct Ca2+ signaling patterns in smooth muscle. Sarcolemma Ca2+ entry increases [Ca2+]c uniformly; agonists activate InsP3R and produce Ca2+ waves. Waves progress by Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release at InsP3R, and persistent Ca2+-dependent inhibition of InsP3R accounts for the decline in [Ca2+]c at the back of the wave.",
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author = "J.G. McCarron and D. MacMillan and K.N. Bradley and S. Chalmers and T.C. Muir",
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language = "English",
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journal = "Journal of Biological Chemistry",
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Origin and mechanisms of Ca2+ waves in smooth muscle as revealed by localized photolysis of caged inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. / McCarron, J.G.; MacMillan, D.; Bradley, K.N.; Chalmers, S.; Muir, T.C.

In: Journal of Biological Chemistry, Vol. 279, 2004, p. 8417-8427.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Origin and mechanisms of Ca2+ waves in smooth muscle as revealed by localized photolysis of caged inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate

AU - McCarron, J.G.

AU - MacMillan, D.

AU - Bradley, K.N.

AU - Chalmers, S.

AU - Muir, T.C.

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - The cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c) controls diverse cellular events via various Ca2+ signaling patterns; the latter are influenced by the method of cell activation. Here, in single-voltage clamped smooth muscle cells, sarcolemma depolarization generated uniform increases in [Ca2+]c throughout the cell entirely by Ca2+ influx. On the other hand, the Ca2+ signal produced by InsP3-generating agonists was a propagated wave. Using localized uncaged InsP3, the forward movement of the Ca2+ wave arose from Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release at the InsP3 receptor (InsP3R) without ryanodine receptor involvement. The decline in [Ca2+]c (the back of the wave) occurred from a functional compartmentalization of the store, which rendered the site of InsP3-mediated Ca2+ release, and only this site, refractory to the phosphoinositide. The functional compartmentalization arose by a localized feedback deactivation of InsP3 receptors produced by an increased [Ca2+]c rather than a reduced luminal [Ca2+] or an increased cytoplasmic [InsP3]. The deactivation of the InsP3 receptor was delayed in onset, compared with the time of the rise in [Ca2+]c, persisted (>30 s) even when [Ca2+]c had regained resting levels, and was not prevented by kinase or phosphatase inhibitors. Thus different forms of cell activation generate distinct Ca2+ signaling patterns in smooth muscle. Sarcolemma Ca2+ entry increases [Ca2+]c uniformly; agonists activate InsP3R and produce Ca2+ waves. Waves progress by Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release at InsP3R, and persistent Ca2+-dependent inhibition of InsP3R accounts for the decline in [Ca2+]c at the back of the wave.

AB - The cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c) controls diverse cellular events via various Ca2+ signaling patterns; the latter are influenced by the method of cell activation. Here, in single-voltage clamped smooth muscle cells, sarcolemma depolarization generated uniform increases in [Ca2+]c throughout the cell entirely by Ca2+ influx. On the other hand, the Ca2+ signal produced by InsP3-generating agonists was a propagated wave. Using localized uncaged InsP3, the forward movement of the Ca2+ wave arose from Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release at the InsP3 receptor (InsP3R) without ryanodine receptor involvement. The decline in [Ca2+]c (the back of the wave) occurred from a functional compartmentalization of the store, which rendered the site of InsP3-mediated Ca2+ release, and only this site, refractory to the phosphoinositide. The functional compartmentalization arose by a localized feedback deactivation of InsP3 receptors produced by an increased [Ca2+]c rather than a reduced luminal [Ca2+] or an increased cytoplasmic [InsP3]. The deactivation of the InsP3 receptor was delayed in onset, compared with the time of the rise in [Ca2+]c, persisted (>30 s) even when [Ca2+]c had regained resting levels, and was not prevented by kinase or phosphatase inhibitors. Thus different forms of cell activation generate distinct Ca2+ signaling patterns in smooth muscle. Sarcolemma Ca2+ entry increases [Ca2+]c uniformly; agonists activate InsP3R and produce Ca2+ waves. Waves progress by Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release at InsP3R, and persistent Ca2+-dependent inhibition of InsP3R accounts for the decline in [Ca2+]c at the back of the wave.

KW - smooth muscle

KW - photolysis

KW - caged inositol

KW - trisphosphate

U2 - 10.1074/jbc.M311797200

DO - 10.1074/jbc.M311797200

M3 - Article

VL - 279

SP - 8417

EP - 8427

JO - Journal of Biological Chemistry

T2 - Journal of Biological Chemistry

JF - Journal of Biological Chemistry

SN - 0021-9258

ER -