Orientalism redeployed

art as cultural self-critique and self-representation

Derek Bryce, Elizabeth Carnegie

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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Abstract

This paper looks at special exhibitions and galleries holdings of "Western" Orientalist art of the 19th and early 20th centuries. This was art produced for the "West" in the early stages of its imperialist interest in the Middle East and our project focuses on the conditions under which this art emerged. Taking as our theoretical context the legacy of Edward W. Said’s study, Orientalism, we initially focussed our attention upon nationally legitimated UK museums’ presentation of cultural objects produced in the Middle East to a ‘Western’ audience (see Bryce and Carnegie 2013). Drawing on, for example, recent exhibitions in the UK (Bellini and the East. National Gallery 2006, The Lure of the East: British Orientalist painting. Tate Britain. 2008), and the USA (The Spectacular Art of Jean-Léon Gérôme, Getty) our study now explores the recent reappraisal of this body of art in western galleries as means of self-critique amidst "post 9/11" discourses. We additionally, examine the recent interest in, acquisition of, and display of Orientalist art in Turkish and Middle Eastern collections as a powerful statement of agency and a means to observe the self through the gaze of the Western "other." Our research question is, to what extent are these twin deployments of this problematic genre of art part of a wider, potentially unifying discursive formation.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 4 Aug 2014
Event7th International Conference on the Inclusive Museum - Autry Centre for the American West, Los Angeles, United States
Duration: 11 Aug 201414 Aug 2014

Conference

Conference7th International Conference on the Inclusive Museum
CountryUnited States
CityLos Angeles
Period11/08/1414/08/14

Fingerprint

Orientalism
Self-representation
Art
Orientalist
Middle East
Imperialist
Discourse
National Gallery
Discursive Formation
Holdings
September 11 Attacks
Tate Britain
Cultural Objects
Jeans
20th century
September 11 attacks

Keywords

  • orientalism
  • museum
  • marketing
  • art

Cite this

Bryce, D., & Carnegie, E. (2014). Orientalism redeployed: art as cultural self-critique and self-representation. Paper presented at 7th International Conference on the Inclusive Museum, Los Angeles, United States.
Bryce, Derek ; Carnegie, Elizabeth. / Orientalism redeployed : art as cultural self-critique and self-representation. Paper presented at 7th International Conference on the Inclusive Museum, Los Angeles, United States.
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Bryce, D & Carnegie, E 2014, 'Orientalism redeployed: art as cultural self-critique and self-representation' Paper presented at 7th International Conference on the Inclusive Museum, Los Angeles, United States, 11/08/14 - 14/08/14, .

Orientalism redeployed : art as cultural self-critique and self-representation. / Bryce, Derek; Carnegie, Elizabeth.

2014. Paper presented at 7th International Conference on the Inclusive Museum, Los Angeles, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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Bryce D, Carnegie E. Orientalism redeployed: art as cultural self-critique and self-representation. 2014. Paper presented at 7th International Conference on the Inclusive Museum, Los Angeles, United States.