Operating efficiencies in pulsed carbon-dioxide lasers

A.L.S. Smith, J. Mellis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Computer models of the CO2‐N2‐He laser system usually predict that 20%-33% of the discharge energy should be available as radiation output. Using a comprehensive kinetics model to study vibrational temperatures and stored energies, we find a deterioration in laser efficiency with increasing input energy, due to electron superelastic losses during the excitation pulse. Experimental observations support the calculated vibrational temperatures and likewise our predicted 8%-12% yield efficiency at optimum excitation is in good agreement with the values realized in working lasers.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1037-1039
Number of pages2
JournalApplied Physics Letters
Volume41
Issue number11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1982

Fingerprint

carbon dioxide lasers
lasers
deterioration
excitation
energy
temperature
output
kinetics
radiation
pulses
electrons

Keywords

  • carbon-dioxide lasers
  • computer modelling
  • laser efficiency

Cite this

Smith, A.L.S. ; Mellis, J. / Operating efficiencies in pulsed carbon-dioxide lasers. In: Applied Physics Letters. 1982 ; Vol. 41, No. 11. pp. 1037-1039.
@article{645e1fe1547243b69d2d66c06f30135c,
title = "Operating efficiencies in pulsed carbon-dioxide lasers",
abstract = "Computer models of the CO2‐N2‐He laser system usually predict that 20{\%}-33{\%} of the discharge energy should be available as radiation output. Using a comprehensive kinetics model to study vibrational temperatures and stored energies, we find a deterioration in laser efficiency with increasing input energy, due to electron superelastic losses during the excitation pulse. Experimental observations support the calculated vibrational temperatures and likewise our predicted 8{\%}-12{\%} yield efficiency at optimum excitation is in good agreement with the values realized in working lasers.",
keywords = "carbon-dioxide lasers, computer modelling, laser efficiency",
author = "A.L.S. Smith and J. Mellis",
year = "1982",
doi = "10.1063/1.93385",
language = "English",
volume = "41",
pages = "1037--1039",
journal = "Applied Physics Letters",
issn = "0003-6951",
number = "11",

}

Operating efficiencies in pulsed carbon-dioxide lasers. / Smith, A.L.S.; Mellis, J.

In: Applied Physics Letters, Vol. 41, No. 11, 1982, p. 1037-1039.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Operating efficiencies in pulsed carbon-dioxide lasers

AU - Smith, A.L.S.

AU - Mellis, J.

PY - 1982

Y1 - 1982

N2 - Computer models of the CO2‐N2‐He laser system usually predict that 20%-33% of the discharge energy should be available as radiation output. Using a comprehensive kinetics model to study vibrational temperatures and stored energies, we find a deterioration in laser efficiency with increasing input energy, due to electron superelastic losses during the excitation pulse. Experimental observations support the calculated vibrational temperatures and likewise our predicted 8%-12% yield efficiency at optimum excitation is in good agreement with the values realized in working lasers.

AB - Computer models of the CO2‐N2‐He laser system usually predict that 20%-33% of the discharge energy should be available as radiation output. Using a comprehensive kinetics model to study vibrational temperatures and stored energies, we find a deterioration in laser efficiency with increasing input energy, due to electron superelastic losses during the excitation pulse. Experimental observations support the calculated vibrational temperatures and likewise our predicted 8%-12% yield efficiency at optimum excitation is in good agreement with the values realized in working lasers.

KW - carbon-dioxide lasers

KW - computer modelling

KW - laser efficiency

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.93385

U2 - 10.1063/1.93385

DO - 10.1063/1.93385

M3 - Article

VL - 41

SP - 1037

EP - 1039

JO - Applied Physics Letters

T2 - Applied Physics Letters

JF - Applied Physics Letters

SN - 0003-6951

IS - 11

ER -