On being spiritual: pilgrimage as an information context

Nadia Caidi, Perla Innocenti

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOther

Abstract

Religious and secular pilgrimages have been part of human history since the beginning of time and remain very much alive today, whether it is the Holy Land, the Hajj, Lhasa, Kumbh Mela, Char Dham, or else the Camino de Santiago, Kumano Kodo, Glastonbury Tor, Elvis's Graceland, national parks or war memorials. Pilgrimage has been an object of study across disciplines, in art, architecture, and heritage (Avril et al 2015; Paul Davies 2013), history (Elsner 2005; Janin 2002), literature (Edwards 2005), social anthropology (Badone and Roseman 2004), religious studies and tourism (Ross-Bryant 2017; Norman and Cusack 2015; Coleman and Elsner 2002; Llyod 1998) among others. Yet, pilgrimage as a context for research in Information Studies has been surprisingly overlooked (exceptions include Bati, 2015; Caidi et al., 2018, along with some foundational work on spirituality by Kari (2007) or Gaston et al. (2015)). This panel fills the gap by offering an information perspective to the study of pilgrimage, shedding a light on approaches and concepts from our field that can enrich our understanding of the complexities of the pilgrim's journey through the lens of information and media practices, embodied experiences, memory work, curation practices, community-building, information mediation and sharing, and virtuality and pilgrimage in a global and digital world.

Conference

ConferenceISIC 2018
CountryPoland
CityKraków
Period9/10/1811/10/18

Fingerprint

pilgrimage
cultural anthropology
history
memorial
national park
spirituality
mediation
Tourism
Pilgrimage
art
community
experience

Keywords

  • information science

Cite this

@conference{fec45edd3cf34590ac2f9bf9156f9f1c,
title = "On being spiritual: pilgrimage as an information context",
abstract = "Religious and secular pilgrimages have been part of human history since the beginning of time and remain very much alive today, whether it is the Holy Land, the Hajj, Lhasa, Kumbh Mela, Char Dham, or else the Camino de Santiago, Kumano Kodo, Glastonbury Tor, Elvis's Graceland, national parks or war memorials. Pilgrimage has been an object of study across disciplines, in art, architecture, and heritage (Avril et al 2015; Paul Davies 2013), history (Elsner 2005; Janin 2002), literature (Edwards 2005), social anthropology (Badone and Roseman 2004), religious studies and tourism (Ross-Bryant 2017; Norman and Cusack 2015; Coleman and Elsner 2002; Llyod 1998) among others. Yet, pilgrimage as a context for research in Information Studies has been surprisingly overlooked (exceptions include Bati, 2015; Caidi et al., 2018, along with some foundational work on spirituality by Kari (2007) or Gaston et al. (2015)). This panel fills the gap by offering an information perspective to the study of pilgrimage, shedding a light on approaches and concepts from our field that can enrich our understanding of the complexities of the pilgrim's journey through the lens of information and media practices, embodied experiences, memory work, curation practices, community-building, information mediation and sharing, and virtuality and pilgrimage in a global and digital world.",
keywords = "information science",
author = "Nadia Caidi and Perla Innocenti",
year = "2018",
month = "10",
day = "1",
language = "English",
note = "ISIC 2018 : the Information Behaviour Conference ; Conference date: 09-10-2018 Through 11-10-2018",

}

Caidi, N & Innocenti, P 2018, 'On being spiritual: pilgrimage as an information context' ISIC 2018, Kraków, Poland, 9/10/18 - 11/10/18, .

On being spiritual : pilgrimage as an information context. / Caidi, Nadia; Innocenti, Perla.

2018. ISIC 2018, Kraków, Poland.

Research output: Contribution to conferenceOther

TY - CONF

T1 - On being spiritual

T2 - pilgrimage as an information context

AU - Caidi, Nadia

AU - Innocenti, Perla

PY - 2018/10/1

Y1 - 2018/10/1

N2 - Religious and secular pilgrimages have been part of human history since the beginning of time and remain very much alive today, whether it is the Holy Land, the Hajj, Lhasa, Kumbh Mela, Char Dham, or else the Camino de Santiago, Kumano Kodo, Glastonbury Tor, Elvis's Graceland, national parks or war memorials. Pilgrimage has been an object of study across disciplines, in art, architecture, and heritage (Avril et al 2015; Paul Davies 2013), history (Elsner 2005; Janin 2002), literature (Edwards 2005), social anthropology (Badone and Roseman 2004), religious studies and tourism (Ross-Bryant 2017; Norman and Cusack 2015; Coleman and Elsner 2002; Llyod 1998) among others. Yet, pilgrimage as a context for research in Information Studies has been surprisingly overlooked (exceptions include Bati, 2015; Caidi et al., 2018, along with some foundational work on spirituality by Kari (2007) or Gaston et al. (2015)). This panel fills the gap by offering an information perspective to the study of pilgrimage, shedding a light on approaches and concepts from our field that can enrich our understanding of the complexities of the pilgrim's journey through the lens of information and media practices, embodied experiences, memory work, curation practices, community-building, information mediation and sharing, and virtuality and pilgrimage in a global and digital world.

AB - Religious and secular pilgrimages have been part of human history since the beginning of time and remain very much alive today, whether it is the Holy Land, the Hajj, Lhasa, Kumbh Mela, Char Dham, or else the Camino de Santiago, Kumano Kodo, Glastonbury Tor, Elvis's Graceland, national parks or war memorials. Pilgrimage has been an object of study across disciplines, in art, architecture, and heritage (Avril et al 2015; Paul Davies 2013), history (Elsner 2005; Janin 2002), literature (Edwards 2005), social anthropology (Badone and Roseman 2004), religious studies and tourism (Ross-Bryant 2017; Norman and Cusack 2015; Coleman and Elsner 2002; Llyod 1998) among others. Yet, pilgrimage as a context for research in Information Studies has been surprisingly overlooked (exceptions include Bati, 2015; Caidi et al., 2018, along with some foundational work on spirituality by Kari (2007) or Gaston et al. (2015)). This panel fills the gap by offering an information perspective to the study of pilgrimage, shedding a light on approaches and concepts from our field that can enrich our understanding of the complexities of the pilgrim's journey through the lens of information and media practices, embodied experiences, memory work, curation practices, community-building, information mediation and sharing, and virtuality and pilgrimage in a global and digital world.

KW - information science

M3 - Other

ER -