Nurses as managers: between a professional rock and an HRM hard place?

S.C. Bolton

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    7 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This paper aims to give some insight into the role of nurses as managers in the British National Health Service (NHS). Concentrating on the role of line and middle management i.e. ward and clinical nurse managers, it is shown how attempts are made to cultivate nurse managers as major change agents in a time of cultural transformation for the NHS. This role has been greeted by senior nurses with mixed feelings: enthusiasm for introducing quality-led initiatives but also ambivalence towards fully embracing a management identity. Nurses have proved themselves to be competent middle managers throughout the history of the hospital service (Bradhsaw 1995). Nevertheless, many of the contradictions they now face could be attributed to a lack of investment in management training and development in the context of a period of major reform for the British public services.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)229-234
    Number of pages5
    JournalHuman Resource Development International
    Volume3
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2000

    Fingerprint

    Managers
    Nurses
    National Health Service
    Hospital services
    Middle management
    Middle managers
    Identity management
    Management training
    Line management
    Training and development
    Ambivalence
    Management development
    Public services

    Keywords

    • national health service
    • NHS
    • line management
    • nurse managers

    Cite this

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    Nurses as managers: between a professional rock and an HRM hard place? / Bolton, S.C.

    In: Human Resource Development International, Vol. 3, No. 2, 06.2000, p. 229-234.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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