No simple dichotomies: lobbyists and the European parliament

David Judge, D. Earnshaw

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)
313 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

To call lobbyists of the European Parliament ‘unelected legislators’ is somewhat misleading. Similarly, to talk of ‘inspired legislation’, where laws, or more particularly amendments to legislation, are ‘written by a lobby group from the civil society and more or less rubber stamped by a public body’1 is to over-simplify a complex and mediated relationship between elected ‘legislators’ and unelected ‘interest representatives’. Indeed, in the case of the European Union (EU), identifying a single ‘public body’ as a ‘legislator’ is problematic in itself as all three major institutions – Commission, Council and European Parliament – perform legislative roles. Moreover, securing a single, clearly defined imprint of a ‘rubber stamp’ on legislation is difficult given the inter-institutional bargaining that results in blurred and smudged legislative imprints at the best of times.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)61-79
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Legislative Studies
Volume8
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2002

Keywords

  • lobbyists
  • european parliament
  • politics

Research Output

  • 10 Citations
  • 1 Chapter

No Simple Dichotomies: Lobbyists and the European Parliament

Judge, D., Earnshaw, D., van Schendelen, R. (ed.) & Scully, R. (ed.), 2003, The Unseen Hand: Unelected EU legislators. London, p. 61-79 18 p.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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