Negative consequences of an adaptive process: Retrieval inhibition and memory distortion

Malcolm MacLeod, Jo Saunders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite the fact that misinformation effects have long been studied by both applied researchers and modelers of human memory, there is little consensus as to the value of such endeavors. We argue that this may be due to a failure to identify the underlying mechanism responsible for such memory distortions. We consider novel evidence for a relationship between retrieval-induced forgetting and the reporting of misinformation. We also explore the extent to which retrieval inhibition underpins this relationship and the implications this has for the modeling of memory and finding potential solutions to real-world problems.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)26-30
Number of pages5
JournalCurrent Directions in Psychological Science
Volume17
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2008

Keywords

  • misinformation effect
  • eyewitnessing
  • retrieval-induced forgetting
  • retrieval inhibition

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Negative consequences of an adaptive process: Retrieval inhibition and memory distortion'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this