Near minimum-time trajectories for solar sails

M. Otten, C.R. McInnes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

SOLAR sailing has long been considered for a diverse range of future mission applications. As with other forms of low-thrust propulsion, trajectory optimization has been a focus of development activities. In particular, minimum-time solar-sail trajectories have been obtained by several authors for a range of mission applications. Almost all of these studies have used the Pontryagin principle of the calculus of variations to obtain minimum-time trajectories by the classical, indirect method (see, for example, Ref. 2). The indirect approach provides a continuous time history for the required solar sail steering angles. Only a few studies have used the competing direct approach, which recasts the task as a parameter optimization problem by discretizing the control variables. These studies have used many discrete segments for the sail steering angles to ensure a close approximation to the continuous steering angles provided by the indirect approach and hence a close approximation to the true minimum-time trajectory
LanguageEnglish
Pages632-634
Number of pages2
JournalJournal of Guidance, Control and Dynamics
Volume24
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Solar sails
solar sails
ice ridge
trajectory
Trajectories
trajectories
Trajectory
Angle
Pontryagin's Principle
Trajectory Optimization
pontryagin principle
low thrust propulsion
Parameter Optimization
trajectory optimization
Approximation
Range of data
Continuous Time
approximation
Propulsion
Optimization Problem

Keywords

  • solar sails
  • control systems
  • guidance systems
  • trajectories

Cite this

Otten, M. ; McInnes, C.R. / Near minimum-time trajectories for solar sails. In: Journal of Guidance, Control and Dynamics. 2001 ; Vol. 24, No. 5. pp. 632-634.
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Otten, M & McInnes, CR 2001, 'Near minimum-time trajectories for solar sails' Journal of Guidance, Control and Dynamics, vol. 24, no. 5, pp. 632-634.

Near minimum-time trajectories for solar sails. / Otten, M.; McInnes, C.R.

In: Journal of Guidance, Control and Dynamics, Vol. 24, No. 5, 2001, p. 632-634.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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