Near Earth object modification using gravitational coupling

C.R. McInnes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It has been well documented that the population of near Earth objects (NEO) poses a terrestrial impact hazard [1-4]. Although current efforts are focused on detecting and cataloging such objects, various schemes for hazard mitigation have been proposed and investigated in some detail [5-15]. Nuclear devices appear attractive for deflecting potentially hazardous NEOs [5], although serious political issues arise concerning the deployment of such devices in space [11]. To overcome such difficulties, a range of nonnuclear options have been proposed. Concepts include focusing solar radiation onto the target asteroid with a large collector and smaller steerable secondary mirror to generate a hot jet of exhaust gas [6,7] or coating the asteroid to alter its albedo, and hence modify the Yarkovsky induced acceleration [8]. Somewhat more conventional approaches center on the use of kinetic energy impacts from either prograde [12,13] or retrograde orbits [9,10], or the use of continuous low thrust to increase the predicted Earth miss distance of the NEO using large solar or nuclear electric vehicles.
LanguageEnglish
Pages870-873
Number of pages3
JournalJournal of Guidance, Control and Dynamics
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2007

Fingerprint

near Earth objects
Asteroids
Earth (planet)
asteroids
Hazard
asteroid
hazards
Hazards
nuclear devices
miss distance
retrograde orbits
hazard
low thrust
electric vehicle
Electric Vehicle
exhaust gases
Solar Radiation
jet flow
solar radiation
Exhaust gases

Keywords

  • gravity
  • space travel
  • control systems
  • solar sails

Cite this

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Near Earth object modification using gravitational coupling. / McInnes, C.R.

In: Journal of Guidance, Control and Dynamics, Vol. 30, No. 3, 2007, p. 870-873.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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