Nanoparticles made of multi-block copolymer of lactic acid and ethylene glycol containing periodic side-chain carboxyl groups for oral delivery of cyclosporine A

D. D. Ankola, A. Battisti, R. Solaro, M. N. V. Ravi Kumar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential of new carboxylated multi-block copolymer of lactic acid and ethylene glycol (EL14) for nanoparticle (NP) formation and their ability to deliver high molecular weight hydrophobic drug-cyclosporine A (CsA). CsA-loaded EL14 NPs were compared with traditional poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) NPs, both prepared by emulsion-diffusion-evaporation process. On the one hand, the increase in drug payload from 10 to 30 per cent for EL14 NPs showed no difference in particle size, however the entrapment efficiency tends to decrease from 50 to 43 per cent; on the other hand, the more hydrophobic PLGA showed an increasing trend in entrapment efficiency from 20 to 62 per cent with increasing particle size. Over 90 per cent of CsA was released in vitro from both the nanoparticulates; however, the release was much slower in the case of more hydrophobic PLGA. On in vivo evaluation in rats, the NPs made of EL14 showed a higher C-max, a faster T-max and enhanced tissue levels to that of PLGA that are crucial for CsA's activity and toxicity; however, the overall bioavailability of the nanoparticulates was similar and higher than Neoral. Together these data demonstrate the feasibility of NPs made of low molecular weight, hydrophilic polymer EL14 for efficient delivery of CsA.

LanguageEnglish
PagesS475-S481
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the Royal Society Interface
Volume7
Issue numberSupp 4
Early online date26 May 2010
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 6 Aug 2010

Fingerprint

Ethylene Glycol
Lactic acid
Ethylene glycol
Nanoparticles
Cyclosporine
Block copolymers
Lactic Acid
Molecular weight
Particle size
Emulsions
Toxicity
Rats
Evaporation
Particle Size
Tissue
Molecular Weight
Polymers
Polyglactin 910
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Biological Availability

Keywords

  • drug delivery
  • nanoparticles
  • pharmacokinetics
  • polymer
  • behaviour in-vitro
  • of-the-art
  • PLGA nanoparticles
  • microemulsion formulation
  • transplant recipients
  • renal-transplantation
  • drug-disease
  • PLA

Cite this

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Nanoparticles made of multi-block copolymer of lactic acid and ethylene glycol containing periodic side-chain carboxyl groups for oral delivery of cyclosporine A. / Ankola, D. D.; Battisti, A.; Solaro, R.; Kumar, M. N. V. Ravi.

In: Journal of the Royal Society Interface, Vol. 7, No. Supp 4, 06.08.2010, p. S475-S481.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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