Multiplier Analysis of Re-spending Rebound Effects: Research Briefing 02

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

Abstract

This briefing focuses on a particular type of rebound effect, which results from re-spending decisions as households realise savings due to reduced energy requirements. Measuring rebound from re-spending involves identifying changes in emissions-relevant energy use embodied in the supply chains of different goods/services that households may switch consumption between as their energy requirements are reduced In assessing re-spending options, we consider a carbon saving multiplier (CSM). This measures the change in embodied supply chain emissions per kilotonne (kt) directly saved by UK households. A key aim of policy will then be to limit the erosion of this multiplier value. Our central finding is that upward rebound effects in supply chains supporting re-spending decisions erode carbon saving multiplier effects of reduced energy spending. There may also be important effects in terms of increased emissions overseas (carbon leakage) because non-energy supply chains tend to be more international than energy supply chains.
LanguageEnglish
Place of PublicationGlasgow
PublisherUniversity of Strathclyde
Number of pages6
Publication statusPublished - 30 Jan 2016

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multiplier
Supply chains
supply
energy
Carbon
energy supply
overseas
savings
erosion
Erosion
Switches
Values

Keywords

  • re-spending rebound effects
  • energy savings
  • energy efficiency
  • carbon saving multipliers
  • CSM
  • CO2 savings
  • household energy use

Cite this

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title = "Multiplier Analysis of Re-spending Rebound Effects: Research Briefing 02",
abstract = "This briefing focuses on a particular type of rebound effect, which results from re-spending decisions as households realise savings due to reduced energy requirements. Measuring rebound from re-spending involves identifying changes in emissions-relevant energy use embodied in the supply chains of different goods/services that households may switch consumption between as their energy requirements are reduced In assessing re-spending options, we consider a carbon saving multiplier (CSM). This measures the change in embodied supply chain emissions per kilotonne (kt) directly saved by UK households. A key aim of policy will then be to limit the erosion of this multiplier value. Our central finding is that upward rebound effects in supply chains supporting re-spending decisions erode carbon saving multiplier effects of reduced energy spending. There may also be important effects in terms of increased emissions overseas (carbon leakage) because non-energy supply chains tend to be more international than energy supply chains.",
keywords = "re-spending rebound effects, energy savings, energy efficiency, carbon saving multipliers, CSM, CO2 savings, household energy use",
author = "Karen Turner and Antonios Katris",
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Multiplier Analysis of Re-spending Rebound Effects : Research Briefing 02. / Turner, Karen; Katris, Antonios.

Glasgow : University of Strathclyde, 2016. 6 p.

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

TY - BOOK

T1 - Multiplier Analysis of Re-spending Rebound Effects

T2 - Research Briefing 02

AU - Turner, Karen

AU - Katris, Antonios

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AB - This briefing focuses on a particular type of rebound effect, which results from re-spending decisions as households realise savings due to reduced energy requirements. Measuring rebound from re-spending involves identifying changes in emissions-relevant energy use embodied in the supply chains of different goods/services that households may switch consumption between as their energy requirements are reduced In assessing re-spending options, we consider a carbon saving multiplier (CSM). This measures the change in embodied supply chain emissions per kilotonne (kt) directly saved by UK households. A key aim of policy will then be to limit the erosion of this multiplier value. Our central finding is that upward rebound effects in supply chains supporting re-spending decisions erode carbon saving multiplier effects of reduced energy spending. There may also be important effects in terms of increased emissions overseas (carbon leakage) because non-energy supply chains tend to be more international than energy supply chains.

KW - re-spending rebound effects

KW - energy savings

KW - energy efficiency

KW - carbon saving multipliers

KW - CSM

KW - CO2 savings

KW - household energy use

UR - http://www.strath.ac.uk/research/internationalpublicpolicyinstitute/

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