Multiple organizational identities and legitimacy: the rhetoric of police websites

J.A.A. Sillince, A.D. Brown

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    76 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    This article analyses how multiple organizational identities are constructed through rhetoric to maintain and enhance the legitimacy claims made by organizations. Our theorizing is founded on an investigation of the 43 geographically based English and Welsh constabularies. The research contribution of our study is threefold. First, we show that officially sanctioned web-based organizational identity claims are multiple and discuss their implications for identity theory. Second, we consider how these multiple identity claims are constituted using particular rhetorical strategies. Third, we argue that the multiple identity claims constituted aspects of constabularies' self presentation strategies by which they attempted to exert control over stakeholders' perceptions and establish pragmatic, cognitive and moral claims to legitimacy. This is contrary to some previous research that has suggested that organizations seek to reconcile or redefine multiple claims, and that has ignored them as a resource for satisfying sceptical audiences. The principal argument we make is that organizational identities are often multiple, are phrased using specific rhetorical schemes, and that identity multiplicity supports claims for legitimacy.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages1829-1856
    Number of pages27
    JournalHuman Relations
    Volume62
    Issue number12
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2009

    Fingerprint

    Law enforcement
    website
    Websites
    rhetoric
    legitimacy
    police
    self-presentation
    Organizational legitimacy
    Legitimacy
    Web sites
    Police
    Organizational identity
    Rhetoric
    Organizational Identity
    Web Sites
    pragmatics
    stakeholder
    Multiple identities
    resources

    Keywords

    • legitimacy
    • organizational identity
    • police
    • rhetoric
    • websites

    Cite this

    Sillince, J.A.A. ; Brown, A.D. / Multiple organizational identities and legitimacy: the rhetoric of police websites. In: Human Relations. 2009 ; Vol. 62, No. 12. pp. 1829-1856.
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    Multiple organizational identities and legitimacy: the rhetoric of police websites. / Sillince, J.A.A.; Brown, A.D.

    In: Human Relations, Vol. 62, No. 12, 2009, p. 1829-1856.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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