Moral panics and Glasgow gangs: exploring 'the new wave of Glasgow hooliganism', 1965-1970

A. Bartie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Between 1965 and 1968, gangs 'reappeared' in Glasgow. Perceived as younger, more violent and more dangerous to the public than their interwar predecessors, concern quickly grew in the media, police force, local and national government and the public domain more generally. This article uses the sociological concept of 'moral panics' to explore 'the New Wave of Glasgow Hooliganism'. It demonstrates the social construction of 'deviance' in practice, placing escalating concerns and debates over solutions to 'the gang problem' in the wider context of fears about increasing levels of youth violence in the 1960s Britain. In Glasgow, popular perceptions and 'folk-lore' about gangs affected opinions and responses, and often conflicted with empirical evidence conducted at the time.
LanguageEnglish
Pages385-408
Number of pages24
JournalContemporary British History
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2010

Fingerprint

police force
social construction
Law enforcement
deviant behavior
violence
police
anxiety
evidence
time
young
public domain
public
opinion
youth
Violence
Gangs
Waves
Moral Panic
Glasgow

Keywords

  • gangs
  • moral panics
  • youth
  • crime
  • violence

Cite this

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Moral panics and Glasgow gangs : exploring 'the new wave of Glasgow hooliganism', 1965-1970. / Bartie, A.

In: Contemporary British History, Vol. 24, No. 3, 07.2010, p. 385-408.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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