Monitoring crack propagation in turbine blades caused by thermosonic inspection

G. Bolu, A. Gachagan, G. Pierce, G. Harvey, L. Choong

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

High power acoustic excitation of components during a thermosonic (or Sonic IR) inspection may further propagate existing cracks. Monitoring such changes through destructive or non-destructive means is no trivial task. Process Compensated Resonance Testing (PCRT) technology offers the capability to
monitor the growth of fatigue-induced cracks (and other progressive defects) through statistical analysis of changes in a components resonant spectra over time. This technique can be used to detect changes in material properties
by comparing a components spectra to itself at regular intervals after systematic exposure to high power excitation associated with thermosonic inspection. In this work, the resonant spectra of 6 cracked and 6 uncracked turbine blades are captured prior to batch of inspections. Next, these spectra are analysed using proprietary software for changes in resonant behaviour. Results from this work
indicate that a typical thermosonic inspection of a turbine blade for crack detection does not cause crack propagation or degrade a blades structural integrity.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationREVIEW OF PROGRESS IN QUANTITATIVE NONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION
Pages1654
Volume29
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2010
EventReview of Progress in Quantitative NDE - Kingston, Rhode Island, United States
Duration: 26 Jul 200931 Jul 2009

Conference

ConferenceReview of Progress in Quantitative NDE
CountryUnited States
CityKingston, Rhode Island
Period26/07/0931/07/09

Fingerprint

Turbomachine blades
Crack propagation
Turbines
Inspection
Monitoring
Cracks
Crack detection
Structural integrity
Statistical methods
Acoustics
Fatigue of materials
Defects
Testing

Keywords

  • crack propagation
  • turbine blades
  • thermosonic inspection
  • high power acoustic excitation
  • process compensated resonance testing
  • fatigue-induced cracks
  • resonant behaviour

Cite this

Bolu, G., Gachagan, A., Pierce, G., Harvey, G., & Choong, L. (2010). Monitoring crack propagation in turbine blades caused by thermosonic inspection. In REVIEW OF PROGRESS IN QUANTITATIVE NONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION (Vol. 29, pp. 1654)
Bolu, G. ; Gachagan, A. ; Pierce, G. ; Harvey, G. ; Choong, L. / Monitoring crack propagation in turbine blades caused by thermosonic inspection. REVIEW OF PROGRESS IN QUANTITATIVE NONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION . Vol. 29 2010. pp. 1654
@inproceedings{f0bd140ecac442468f94f75a19304592,
title = "Monitoring crack propagation in turbine blades caused by thermosonic inspection",
abstract = "High power acoustic excitation of components during a thermosonic (or Sonic IR) inspection may further propagate existing cracks. Monitoring such changes through destructive or non-destructive means is no trivial task. Process Compensated Resonance Testing (PCRT) technology offers the capability tomonitor the growth of fatigue-induced cracks (and other progressive defects) through statistical analysis of changes in a components resonant spectra over time. This technique can be used to detect changes in material propertiesby comparing a components spectra to itself at regular intervals after systematic exposure to high power excitation associated with thermosonic inspection. In this work, the resonant spectra of 6 cracked and 6 uncracked turbine blades are captured prior to batch of inspections. Next, these spectra are analysed using proprietary software for changes in resonant behaviour. Results from this workindicate that a typical thermosonic inspection of a turbine blade for crack detection does not cause crack propagation or degrade a blades structural integrity.",
keywords = "crack propagation, turbine blades, thermosonic inspection, high power acoustic excitation, process compensated resonance testing, fatigue-induced cracks, resonant behaviour",
author = "G. Bolu and A. Gachagan and G. Pierce and G. Harvey and L. Choong",
year = "2010",
month = "2",
language = "English",
isbn = "978-0-7354-0748-0",
volume = "29",
pages = "1654",
booktitle = "REVIEW OF PROGRESS IN QUANTITATIVE NONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION",

}

Bolu, G, Gachagan, A, Pierce, G, Harvey, G & Choong, L 2010, Monitoring crack propagation in turbine blades caused by thermosonic inspection. in REVIEW OF PROGRESS IN QUANTITATIVE NONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION . vol. 29, pp. 1654, Review of Progress in Quantitative NDE, Kingston, Rhode Island, United States, 26/07/09.

Monitoring crack propagation in turbine blades caused by thermosonic inspection. / Bolu, G.; Gachagan, A.; Pierce, G.; Harvey, G.; Choong, L.

REVIEW OF PROGRESS IN QUANTITATIVE NONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION . Vol. 29 2010. p. 1654.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

TY - GEN

T1 - Monitoring crack propagation in turbine blades caused by thermosonic inspection

AU - Bolu, G.

AU - Gachagan, A.

AU - Pierce, G.

AU - Harvey, G.

AU - Choong, L.

PY - 2010/2

Y1 - 2010/2

N2 - High power acoustic excitation of components during a thermosonic (or Sonic IR) inspection may further propagate existing cracks. Monitoring such changes through destructive or non-destructive means is no trivial task. Process Compensated Resonance Testing (PCRT) technology offers the capability tomonitor the growth of fatigue-induced cracks (and other progressive defects) through statistical analysis of changes in a components resonant spectra over time. This technique can be used to detect changes in material propertiesby comparing a components spectra to itself at regular intervals after systematic exposure to high power excitation associated with thermosonic inspection. In this work, the resonant spectra of 6 cracked and 6 uncracked turbine blades are captured prior to batch of inspections. Next, these spectra are analysed using proprietary software for changes in resonant behaviour. Results from this workindicate that a typical thermosonic inspection of a turbine blade for crack detection does not cause crack propagation or degrade a blades structural integrity.

AB - High power acoustic excitation of components during a thermosonic (or Sonic IR) inspection may further propagate existing cracks. Monitoring such changes through destructive or non-destructive means is no trivial task. Process Compensated Resonance Testing (PCRT) technology offers the capability tomonitor the growth of fatigue-induced cracks (and other progressive defects) through statistical analysis of changes in a components resonant spectra over time. This technique can be used to detect changes in material propertiesby comparing a components spectra to itself at regular intervals after systematic exposure to high power excitation associated with thermosonic inspection. In this work, the resonant spectra of 6 cracked and 6 uncracked turbine blades are captured prior to batch of inspections. Next, these spectra are analysed using proprietary software for changes in resonant behaviour. Results from this workindicate that a typical thermosonic inspection of a turbine blade for crack detection does not cause crack propagation or degrade a blades structural integrity.

KW - crack propagation

KW - turbine blades

KW - thermosonic inspection

KW - high power acoustic excitation

KW - process compensated resonance testing

KW - fatigue-induced cracks

KW - resonant behaviour

UR - http://scitation.aip.org/proceedings/confproceed/1211.jsp?agg=rss

UR - http://www.qndeprograms.org/2009/2009%20Abstract%20Book.pdf

UR - http://link.aip.org/link/?APCPCS/1211/1654/1

M3 - Conference contribution book

SN - 978-0-7354-0748-0

VL - 29

SP - 1654

BT - REVIEW OF PROGRESS IN QUANTITATIVE NONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION

ER -

Bolu G, Gachagan A, Pierce G, Harvey G, Choong L. Monitoring crack propagation in turbine blades caused by thermosonic inspection. In REVIEW OF PROGRESS IN QUANTITATIVE NONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION . Vol. 29. 2010. p. 1654