Modified glucose as a sensor to track the metabolism of individual living endothelial cells - observation of the 1602 cm−1 band called "Raman spectroscopic signature of life"

Anna Pieczara, Aleksandra Borek-Dorosz, Szymon Buda, William Tipping, Duncan Graham, Robert Pawlowski, Jacek Mlynarski, Malgorzata Baranska

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Abstract

A relatively new approach to subcellular research is Raman microscopy with the application of sensors called Raman probes. This paper describes the use of the sensitive and specific Raman probe, 3-O-propargyl-d-glucose (3-OPG), to track metabolic changes in endothelial cells (ECs). ECs play a significant role in a healthy and dysfunctional state, the latter is correlated with a range of lifestyle diseases, particularly with cardiovascular disorders. The metabolism and glucose uptake may reflect the physiopathological conditions and cell activity correlated with energy utilization. To study metabolic changes at the subcellular level the glucose analogue, 3-OPG was used, which shows a characteristic and intense Raman band at 2124 cm−1.3-OPG was applied as a sensor to track both, its accumulation in live and fixed ECs and then metabolism in normal and inflamed ECs, by employing two spectroscopic techniques, i.e. spontaneous and stimulated Raman scattering microscopies. The results indicate that 3-OPG is a sensitive sensor to follow glucose metabolism, manifested by the Raman band of 1602 cm−1. The 1602 cm−1 band has been called the “Raman spectroscopic signature of life” in the cell literature, and here we demonstrate that it is attributed to glucose metabolites. Additionally, we have shown that glucose metabolism and its uptake are slowed down in the cellular inflammation. We showed that Raman spectroscopy can be classified as metabolomics, and its uniqueness lies in the fact that it allows the analysis of the processes of a single living cell. Gaining further knowledge on metabolic changes in the endothelium, especially in pathological conditions, may help in identifying markers of cellular dysfunction, and more broadly in cell phenotyping, better understanding of the mechanism of disease development and searching for new treatments.
Original languageEnglish
Article number115234
Number of pages20
JournalBiosensors and Bioelectronics
Volume230
Early online date15 Mar 2023
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jun 2023

Keywords

  • 3-OPG glucose
  • endothelium
  • spontaneous Raman microscopy
  • stimulated Raman scattering

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