Modelling the Distribution of Costs from Network Upgrades for Electric Vehicles (EVs)

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Abstract

This project integrates energy and economic system modelling approaches to investigate the crucial question of who ultimately pays for the costs of upgrading the power network to facilitate the intended roll out of EVs. Our approach facilitates consideration of a range of indirect, and possibly unanticipated and unintended, consequences of network development for EVs through impacts on markets, prices and incomes across the economy. Such effects may affect both the actual pathway of the roll out, and who ultimately pays for required actions. The project involves collaboration between the University of Strathclyde’s Centre for Energy Policy and Scottish Power Energy Networks (SPEN).

The EPSRC National Centre for Energy Systems Integration (CESI) brings together an interdisciplinary team of experts to gain a deeper understanding of the value of taking a whole systems energy approach to the energy trilemma. The CESI flexible research fund supports collaborative, multi-disciplinary, whole energy systems research projects that investigate the UK’s future energy system. For more information on the Centre and our research fund, please see our website www.cesienergy.org.uk .
Original languageEnglish
Place of PublicationGlasgow
PublisherUniversity of Strathclyde
Number of pages2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Nov 2018

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electric vehicle
Electric vehicles
cost
modeling
energy
Costs
Energy policy
Websites
Economics
distribution
economic system
energy policy
income

Keywords

  • renewable energy policy
  • climate change
  • Scotland
  • electric vehicles (EVs)
  • energy efficiency
  • economic growth

Cite this

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title = "Modelling the Distribution of Costs from Network Upgrades for Electric Vehicles (EVs)",
abstract = "This project integrates energy and economic system modelling approaches to investigate the crucial question of who ultimately pays for the costs of upgrading the power network to facilitate the intended roll out of EVs. Our approach facilitates consideration of a range of indirect, and possibly unanticipated and unintended, consequences of network development for EVs through impacts on markets, prices and incomes across the economy. Such effects may affect both the actual pathway of the roll out, and who ultimately pays for required actions. The project involves collaboration between the University of Strathclyde’s Centre for Energy Policy and Scottish Power Energy Networks (SPEN).The EPSRC National Centre for Energy Systems Integration (CESI) brings together an interdisciplinary team of experts to gain a deeper understanding of the value of taking a whole systems energy approach to the energy trilemma. The CESI flexible research fund supports collaborative, multi-disciplinary, whole energy systems research projects that investigate the UK’s future energy system. For more information on the Centre and our research fund, please see our website www.cesienergy.org.uk .",
keywords = "renewable energy policy, climate change, Scotland, electric vehicles (EVs), energy efficiency, economic growth",
author = "Karen Turner and Oluwafisayo Alabi and Gioele Figus and Christian Calvillo and Ragne Low",
note = "Published by the University of Strathclyde's Centre for Energy Policy, as part of the International Public Policy Institute (IPPI).",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
day = "15",
doi = "10.17868/65981",
language = "English",
publisher = "University of Strathclyde",

}

Modelling the Distribution of Costs from Network Upgrades for Electric Vehicles (EVs). / Turner, Karen; Alabi, Oluwafisayo; Figus, Gioele; Calvillo, Christian; Low, Ragne.

Glasgow : University of Strathclyde, 2018. 2 p.

Research output: Book/ReportOther report

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AU - Low, Ragne

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N2 - This project integrates energy and economic system modelling approaches to investigate the crucial question of who ultimately pays for the costs of upgrading the power network to facilitate the intended roll out of EVs. Our approach facilitates consideration of a range of indirect, and possibly unanticipated and unintended, consequences of network development for EVs through impacts on markets, prices and incomes across the economy. Such effects may affect both the actual pathway of the roll out, and who ultimately pays for required actions. The project involves collaboration between the University of Strathclyde’s Centre for Energy Policy and Scottish Power Energy Networks (SPEN).The EPSRC National Centre for Energy Systems Integration (CESI) brings together an interdisciplinary team of experts to gain a deeper understanding of the value of taking a whole systems energy approach to the energy trilemma. The CESI flexible research fund supports collaborative, multi-disciplinary, whole energy systems research projects that investigate the UK’s future energy system. For more information on the Centre and our research fund, please see our website www.cesienergy.org.uk .

AB - This project integrates energy and economic system modelling approaches to investigate the crucial question of who ultimately pays for the costs of upgrading the power network to facilitate the intended roll out of EVs. Our approach facilitates consideration of a range of indirect, and possibly unanticipated and unintended, consequences of network development for EVs through impacts on markets, prices and incomes across the economy. Such effects may affect both the actual pathway of the roll out, and who ultimately pays for required actions. The project involves collaboration between the University of Strathclyde’s Centre for Energy Policy and Scottish Power Energy Networks (SPEN).The EPSRC National Centre for Energy Systems Integration (CESI) brings together an interdisciplinary team of experts to gain a deeper understanding of the value of taking a whole systems energy approach to the energy trilemma. The CESI flexible research fund supports collaborative, multi-disciplinary, whole energy systems research projects that investigate the UK’s future energy system. For more information on the Centre and our research fund, please see our website www.cesienergy.org.uk .

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