Modeling and control design of a Vienna rectifier based electrolyzer

Jose Luis Monroy Morales, Maximo Hernandez Angeles, David Campos-Gaona, Rafael Pena-Alzola, Martin Ordonez, Walter Merida

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

6 Citations (Scopus)
329 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Hydrogen production is an interesting alternative of storing energy. Electrolyzers produce hydrogen through water electrolysis; the resulting hydrogen is later used to generate electricity by using fuel cells, that reverse the process. Electrolyzers use rectifiers to convert the grid ac voltage into dc voltage for supplying the electrolyzer cells. Previous research used a rectification process based on conventional rectifiers (diode-or thyristor-based) which draw non-sinusoidal current from the main grid. This requires increased filtering to prevent power quality problems and equipment malfunctioning/failure. In addition, previous literature assumed simplified models for the power electronics converters and lacked a detailed control system. The Vienna rectifier is a non-regenerative converter that produces sinusoidal currents with low losses due to the reduced number of active switches. This manuscript proposes using the Vienna rectifier as an interface to connect electrolyzers to the ac grid. The dc voltage applied to the electrolyzer is regulated by using another DC-DC converter, which is selected to be a synchronous buck converter for simplicity and maximum efficiency. In this paper, the models of the Vienna rectifier, synchronous buck converter, and the electrolyzer are developed along with their respective controls. The control system has the ability to function in two operation modes for the overall reference: hydrogen production and power demand. The first one is adequate for grid-connected operation and the later for off-grid operation. Simulation results are given to show the validity of the proposed procedures.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2016 IEEE 7th International Symposium on Power Electronics for Distributed Generation Systems, PEDG 2016
Place of PublicationPiscataway, NJ.
PublisherIEEE
Number of pages8
ISBN (Print)978-1-4673-8618-0
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Jul 2016
Event7th IEEE International Symposium on Power Electronics for Distributed Generation Systems, PEDG 2016 - Vancouver, Canada
Duration: 27 Jun 201630 Jun 2016

Conference

Conference7th IEEE International Symposium on Power Electronics for Distributed Generation Systems, PEDG 2016
Abbreviated titlePEDG
CountryCanada
CityVancouver
Period27/06/1630/06/16

Fingerprint

Control Design
Hydrogen
Hydrogen production
Grid
Electric potential
Buck Converter
Modeling
Voltage
Control systems
Converter
DC-DC converters
Power quality
Power electronics
Thyristors
Electrolysis
Control System
Fuel cells
Diodes
Electricity
Power Quality

Keywords

  • alkaline electrolyzer
  • fuel cell
  • hydrogen production
  • hydrogen storage
  • vienna rectifier
  • Water electrolysis

Cite this

Monroy Morales, J. L., Hernandez Angeles, M., Campos-Gaona, D., Pena-Alzola, R., Ordonez, M., & Merida, W. (2016). Modeling and control design of a Vienna rectifier based electrolyzer. In 2016 IEEE 7th International Symposium on Power Electronics for Distributed Generation Systems, PEDG 2016 [7527093] Piscataway, NJ.: IEEE. https://doi.org/10.1109/PEDG.2016.7527093
Monroy Morales, Jose Luis ; Hernandez Angeles, Maximo ; Campos-Gaona, David ; Pena-Alzola, Rafael ; Ordonez, Martin ; Merida, Walter. / Modeling and control design of a Vienna rectifier based electrolyzer. 2016 IEEE 7th International Symposium on Power Electronics for Distributed Generation Systems, PEDG 2016. Piscataway, NJ. : IEEE, 2016.
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Monroy Morales, JL, Hernandez Angeles, M, Campos-Gaona, D, Pena-Alzola, R, Ordonez, M & Merida, W 2016, Modeling and control design of a Vienna rectifier based electrolyzer. in 2016 IEEE 7th International Symposium on Power Electronics for Distributed Generation Systems, PEDG 2016., 7527093, IEEE, Piscataway, NJ., 7th IEEE International Symposium on Power Electronics for Distributed Generation Systems, PEDG 2016, Vancouver, Canada, 27/06/16. https://doi.org/10.1109/PEDG.2016.7527093

Modeling and control design of a Vienna rectifier based electrolyzer. / Monroy Morales, Jose Luis; Hernandez Angeles, Maximo; Campos-Gaona, David; Pena-Alzola, Rafael; Ordonez, Martin; Merida, Walter.

2016 IEEE 7th International Symposium on Power Electronics for Distributed Generation Systems, PEDG 2016. Piscataway, NJ. : IEEE, 2016. 7527093.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

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AU - Ordonez, Martin

AU - Merida, Walter

N1 - © 2016 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other uses, in any current or future media, including reprinting /republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works, for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted component of this work in other works.

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N2 - Hydrogen production is an interesting alternative of storing energy. Electrolyzers produce hydrogen through water electrolysis; the resulting hydrogen is later used to generate electricity by using fuel cells, that reverse the process. Electrolyzers use rectifiers to convert the grid ac voltage into dc voltage for supplying the electrolyzer cells. Previous research used a rectification process based on conventional rectifiers (diode-or thyristor-based) which draw non-sinusoidal current from the main grid. This requires increased filtering to prevent power quality problems and equipment malfunctioning/failure. In addition, previous literature assumed simplified models for the power electronics converters and lacked a detailed control system. The Vienna rectifier is a non-regenerative converter that produces sinusoidal currents with low losses due to the reduced number of active switches. This manuscript proposes using the Vienna rectifier as an interface to connect electrolyzers to the ac grid. The dc voltage applied to the electrolyzer is regulated by using another DC-DC converter, which is selected to be a synchronous buck converter for simplicity and maximum efficiency. In this paper, the models of the Vienna rectifier, synchronous buck converter, and the electrolyzer are developed along with their respective controls. The control system has the ability to function in two operation modes for the overall reference: hydrogen production and power demand. The first one is adequate for grid-connected operation and the later for off-grid operation. Simulation results are given to show the validity of the proposed procedures.

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KW - fuel cell

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KW - vienna rectifier

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Monroy Morales JL, Hernandez Angeles M, Campos-Gaona D, Pena-Alzola R, Ordonez M, Merida W. Modeling and control design of a Vienna rectifier based electrolyzer. In 2016 IEEE 7th International Symposium on Power Electronics for Distributed Generation Systems, PEDG 2016. Piscataway, NJ.: IEEE. 2016. 7527093 https://doi.org/10.1109/PEDG.2016.7527093