Minimum wear duration for the activPAL(TM) professional activity monitor in adolescent females

Keiran P. Dowd, Helen Purtill, Deirdre Harrington, Jane F. Hislop, John J. Reilly, Alan E. Donnelly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)
52 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Objectives: This study aims to determine the minimum number of days of monitoring required to reliably predict sitting/lying time, standing time, light intensity physical activity (LIPA), moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) and steps in adolescent females.
Methods: 195 adolescent females (mean age=15.7 years; SD=0.9) participated in the study. Participants wore the activPAL activity monitor for a seven day protocol. The amount of time spent sitting/lying, standing, in LIPA and in MVPA and the number of steps per day were quantified. Spearman-Brown Prophecy formulae were used to predict the number of days of data required to achieve an intraclass correlation coefficient of both 0.7 and 0.8.
Results: For the percentage of the waking day spent sitting/lying, standing, in LIPA and in MVPA, a minimum of 9 days of accelerometer recording is required to achieve a reliability of ≥0.7, while a minimum of 15 days is required to achieve a reliability of ≥0.8. For steps, a minimum of 12 days of recording is required to achieve a reliability of ≥0.7, with 21 days to achieve a reliability of ≥0.8.
Conclusion: Future research in adolescent females should collect a minimum of 9 days of accelerometer data to reliably estimate sitting/lying time, standing time, LIPA and MVPA, while 12 days is required to reliably estimate steps.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)427-433
Number of pages7
JournalPediatric Exercise Science
Volume29
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Aug 2017

Keywords

  • activePAL
  • adolescent
  • wear time
  • physical activity
  • sedentary behaviour

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