Migration and fiscal policy as factors explaining the labour market resilience of UK regions to the Great Recession

David N. F. Bell, David Eiser

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

London has been at the vanguard of the UK’s recovery from recession, recovering its pre-recession levels of output and employment more rapidly than other regions. A large part of London’s stronger recovery can be explained by increased employment and reduced inactivity among overseas-born immigrants. Furthermore, net outmigration from London to other UK regions fell during the recession, and is only beginning to return to previous levels. Both factors have increased labour supply and may have contributed to more marked real wage falls in London than in other regions. Fiscal austerity may have accentuated the spatial pattern of the UK’s recovery.
LanguageEnglish
Pages197-215
Number of pages19
JournalCambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society
Volume9
Issue number1
Early online date28 Dec 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2016

Fingerprint

fiscal policy
migration policy
recession
labor market
resilience
labor supply
real wages
wage
overseas
immigrant
Labour market
Factors
Migration policy
Great Recession
Fiscal policy
Resilience
Recession

Keywords

  • regional resilience
  • recession
  • unemployment
  • migration

Cite this

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