Migrant Workers in the International Hotel Industry

Research output: Working paper

Abstract

The migrant workers’ presence in the hotel industry has the potential to benefit host countries and employers at destination in bringing new skills, knowledge and innovation as well as a competitive advantage to many companies. Migrant workers can also benefit from their migration experience via higher earnings (wage gaps between the country of origin and destination) as well as the acquisition of skills (technical, occupational and soft skills). However, many migrant workers accept low paid and casual work; their employment is oftentimes seasonal. Segmentation of the labour market, stereotyping and discrimination make the foreign(-born) workforce more vulnerable than the local one. Especially where migrant workers have little or no education or training, they face a heightened risk of exploitation.

Training opportunities are therefore crucial for migrant workers. As stressed at the Global Dialogue Forum on New Developments and Challenges in the Hospitality and Tourism Sector that was held at the ILO in November 2010, “the future HCT workforce will have greater diversity of gender, ethnic background and age profile. To be effective, approaches to skills development for the sector should be part of long-term national growth strategies so that skills development, the industry’s HR needs and overall national labour market policies are linked”.
LanguageEnglish
Place of PublicationGeneva
Number of pages49
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2012

Publication series

NameInternational Migration Paper
PublisherInternational Labour Office
Volume112
ISSN (Print)1020-2668
ISSN (Electronic)1564-4839

Fingerprint

Hotel industry
Migrant workers
Workforce
Skill development
Destination
Employers
Stereotyping
Wage gap
Innovation
Competitive advantage
Segmentation
Growth strategy
OR education
Labour market policy
Labour market
Exploitation
Soft skills
Technical skills
Discrimination
Hospitality

Keywords

  • child labour
  • decent work
  • employment
  • part time employment
  • precarious employment
  • youth employment
  • child workers
  • migrant workers
  • women workers
  • young workers
  • private sector
  • catering
  • hotel industry
  • vulnerable groups
  • internal migration
  • international migration
  • irregular migration
  • migration policy
  • labour migration

Cite this

Baum, T. (2012). Migrant Workers in the International Hotel Industry. (International Migration Paper; Vol. 112). Geneva.
Baum, Thomas. / Migrant Workers in the International Hotel Industry. Geneva, 2012. (International Migration Paper).
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Baum, T 2012 'Migrant Workers in the International Hotel Industry' International Migration Paper, vol. 112, Geneva.

Migrant Workers in the International Hotel Industry. / Baum, Thomas.

Geneva, 2012. (International Migration Paper; Vol. 112).

Research output: Working paper

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