Mental calculation: its place in the development of numeracy

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The current concerns about the standards of numeracy in primary schools, as these are manifest in different official reports (HMI, 1997; DfEE, 1998), have given a revised emphasis to mental calculation. While not completely discounting the wider aspects of mathematical achievement, the topics of space and shape, data handling and measurement are being de-emphasised (Brown et al, 2000) and mental calculation is being emphasised, with there being daily opportunities for children to develop efficient and flexible mental methods of calculating (QCA, 1999; Wilson, 1999). However, the term, mental calculation is not clearly defined (Harries and Spooner, 2000) and without conceptual clarity it may be very difficult for us to recognise, let alone understand, what pedagogical practices are needed to support the objective of increased emphasis on mental calculation. What follows is some consideration of what is meant by the term mental calculation and what this meaning implies for practice.
    LanguageEnglish
    Pages145-154
    Number of pages10
    JournalWestminster Studies in Education
    Volume24
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2001

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    primary school

    Keywords

    • numeracy
    • learning design
    • arithmetic
    • addition
    • subtraction

    Cite this

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    title = "Mental calculation: its place in the development of numeracy",
    abstract = "The current concerns about the standards of numeracy in primary schools, as these are manifest in different official reports (HMI, 1997; DfEE, 1998), have given a revised emphasis to mental calculation. While not completely discounting the wider aspects of mathematical achievement, the topics of space and shape, data handling and measurement are being de-emphasised (Brown et al, 2000) and mental calculation is being emphasised, with there being daily opportunities for children to develop efficient and flexible mental methods of calculating (QCA, 1999; Wilson, 1999). However, the term, mental calculation is not clearly defined (Harries and Spooner, 2000) and without conceptual clarity it may be very difficult for us to recognise, let alone understand, what pedagogical practices are needed to support the objective of increased emphasis on mental calculation. What follows is some consideration of what is meant by the term mental calculation and what this meaning implies for practice.",
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    author = "Effie Maclellan",
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    Mental calculation : its place in the development of numeracy. / Maclellan, Effie.

    In: Westminster Studies in Education, Vol. 24, No. 2, 2001, p. 145-154.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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