Medicines from nature: are natural products still relevant to drug discovery?

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

116 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Historically, most drugs have been derived from natural products, but there has been a shift away from their use with the increasing predominance of molecular approaches to drug discovery. Nevertheless, their structural diversity makes them a valuable source of novel lead compounds against newly discovered therapeutic targets. Technical advances in analytical techniques mean that the use of natural products is easier than before. However, there is a widening gap between natural-product researchers in countries rich in biodiversity and drug discovery scientists immersed in proteomics and high-throughput screening.
LanguageEnglish
Pages196-198
Number of pages3
JournalTrends in Pharmacological Sciences
Volume20
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 1999

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Drug Discovery
Biological Products
Medicine
Lead compounds
Biodiversity
Proteomics
Screening
Research Personnel
Throughput
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • biological products
  • pharmaceutical chemistry
  • molecular cloning
  • preclinical drug evaluation
  • ecosystem
  • humans

Cite this

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Medicines from nature : are natural products still relevant to drug discovery? / Harvey, A L.

In: Trends in Pharmacological Sciences, Vol. 20, No. 5, 01.05.1999, p. 196-198.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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