Materiality and the ontological turn in the anthropocene: establishing a dialogue between law, anthropology and eco-philosophy

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Abstract

One of the earlier editorial pieces of the Journal of Human Rights and the Environment opened with the quote of the American anthropologist Margaret Mead ‘[w]e won’t have a society if we destroy the environment’. 1 Unfortunately, if we look into the evidence of biophysical signs, the threat of environmental breakdown is eminent,2 and humanity’s survival might indeed be under threat. Our ecological footprint on Earth is at such a scale that we find ourselves in a geological epoch called the Anthropocene, 3 characterised as it is by human terraforming of the Earth. 4 Our biosphere is sick and behaves like an infected organism; every living organism in the biosphere is declining. The evidence is increasingly clear: in a scientific study commissioned by the United Nations in 2005, it was reported that humans are responsible for the extinction of 50,000 – 55,000 species each year. 5
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEnvironmental Law and Governance for the Anthropocene
EditorsLouis Kotze
Place of PublicationOxford
Pages137-162
Number of pages26
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jun 2017

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biosphere
anthropology
dialogue
threat
Law
evidence
UNO
human rights
philosophy
Society

Keywords

  • environmental law
  • legal anthropology
  • eco-philosophy

Cite this

Vermeylen, S. (2017). Materiality and the ontological turn in the anthropocene: establishing a dialogue between law, anthropology and eco-philosophy. In L. Kotze (Ed.), Environmental Law and Governance for the Anthropocene (pp. 137-162). Oxford.
Vermeylen, Saskia. / Materiality and the ontological turn in the anthropocene : establishing a dialogue between law, anthropology and eco-philosophy. Environmental Law and Governance for the Anthropocene. editor / Louis Kotze. Oxford, 2017. pp. 137-162
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Vermeylen, S 2017, Materiality and the ontological turn in the anthropocene: establishing a dialogue between law, anthropology and eco-philosophy. in L Kotze (ed.), Environmental Law and Governance for the Anthropocene. Oxford, pp. 137-162.

Materiality and the ontological turn in the anthropocene : establishing a dialogue between law, anthropology and eco-philosophy. / Vermeylen, Saskia.

Environmental Law and Governance for the Anthropocene. ed. / Louis Kotze. Oxford, 2017. p. 137-162.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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Vermeylen S. Materiality and the ontological turn in the anthropocene: establishing a dialogue between law, anthropology and eco-philosophy. In Kotze L, editor, Environmental Law and Governance for the Anthropocene. Oxford. 2017. p. 137-162