Managing labour: UK and Australian employers in comparative perspective, 1900-50

A.J. McIvor, C. Wright

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The exceptionalism of Australian industrial relations has long been asserted. In particular, the Australian system of industrial arbitration has been argued to contrast markedly with other countries, such as Britain, which developed a more 'voluntarist' model of industrial regulation. However this distinction relies upon limited historical research of workplace-level developments. In this paper, we focus on a comparative analysis of employer practice in British and Australian workplaces during the first half of the twentieth century. While we find some differences in the nature and extent of management control between the British and Australian experience, what is more striking are the strong similarities in employer practice in work organisation, employment and industrial relations. While economic and institutional factors explain differences in employer practice, fundamental similarities appear to relate to the close economic and social linkages between British and Australian business.
LanguageEnglish
Number of pages22
JournalLabour History Review
Volume88
Publication statusPublished - 2005

Fingerprint

Employers
Labor
Work place
Industrial relations
Economics
Industrial Relations
Work Place
Work organization
Employment relations
Economic factors
Management control
Comparative analysis
Linkage
Institutional factors
Arbitration
20th century
Fundamental
Historical Research
Comparative Analysis
Exceptionalism

Keywords

  • labour history
  • britain
  • australia
  • industrial relations
  • management

Cite this

@article{bb4f68a23e3c4459b2bfac4be6476915,
title = "Managing labour: UK and Australian employers in comparative perspective, 1900-50",
abstract = "The exceptionalism of Australian industrial relations has long been asserted. In particular, the Australian system of industrial arbitration has been argued to contrast markedly with other countries, such as Britain, which developed a more 'voluntarist' model of industrial regulation. However this distinction relies upon limited historical research of workplace-level developments. In this paper, we focus on a comparative analysis of employer practice in British and Australian workplaces during the first half of the twentieth century. While we find some differences in the nature and extent of management control between the British and Australian experience, what is more striking are the strong similarities in employer practice in work organisation, employment and industrial relations. While economic and institutional factors explain differences in employer practice, fundamental similarities appear to relate to the close economic and social linkages between British and Australian business.",
keywords = "labour history, britain, australia, industrial relations, management",
author = "A.J. McIvor and C. Wright",
year = "2005",
language = "English",
volume = "88",
journal = "Labour History Review",
issn = "0961-5652",

}

Managing labour: UK and Australian employers in comparative perspective, 1900-50. / McIvor, A.J.; Wright, C.

In: Labour History Review, Vol. 88, 2005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Managing labour: UK and Australian employers in comparative perspective, 1900-50

AU - McIvor, A.J.

AU - Wright, C.

PY - 2005

Y1 - 2005

N2 - The exceptionalism of Australian industrial relations has long been asserted. In particular, the Australian system of industrial arbitration has been argued to contrast markedly with other countries, such as Britain, which developed a more 'voluntarist' model of industrial regulation. However this distinction relies upon limited historical research of workplace-level developments. In this paper, we focus on a comparative analysis of employer practice in British and Australian workplaces during the first half of the twentieth century. While we find some differences in the nature and extent of management control between the British and Australian experience, what is more striking are the strong similarities in employer practice in work organisation, employment and industrial relations. While economic and institutional factors explain differences in employer practice, fundamental similarities appear to relate to the close economic and social linkages between British and Australian business.

AB - The exceptionalism of Australian industrial relations has long been asserted. In particular, the Australian system of industrial arbitration has been argued to contrast markedly with other countries, such as Britain, which developed a more 'voluntarist' model of industrial regulation. However this distinction relies upon limited historical research of workplace-level developments. In this paper, we focus on a comparative analysis of employer practice in British and Australian workplaces during the first half of the twentieth century. While we find some differences in the nature and extent of management control between the British and Australian experience, what is more striking are the strong similarities in employer practice in work organisation, employment and industrial relations. While economic and institutional factors explain differences in employer practice, fundamental similarities appear to relate to the close economic and social linkages between British and Australian business.

KW - labour history

KW - britain

KW - australia

KW - industrial relations

KW - management

M3 - Article

VL - 88

JO - Labour History Review

T2 - Labour History Review

JF - Labour History Review

SN - 0961-5652

ER -