Maintaining a frozen shipping environment for Phase I clinical trial distribution

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Abstract

The need for stringent temperature control provides significant challenges to pharmaceutical distributors operating in all sectors of the industry. Products with a frozen storage label requirement can be significantly problematic. This study aimed to provide evidence of robust and reproducible frozen shipment arrangements to be operated by a Phase I clinical trial unit. Dry ice was used to achieve a deep frozen internal parcel environment and was tested in a laboratory setting using ultra low temperature loggers within dummy product packs within the test parcels. The laboratory dry ice packing configuration was then repeatedly tested in real time transits using a Glasgow to London delivery schedule. An internal temperature specification was set to not exceed −10 °C during the transport. During each delivery, external temperature monitoring measured the temperature stress experienced by the box in transit. Results demonstrated the ability of the chosen system to not exceed −13.6 °C on average (−10 °C maximum) when exposed to external temperatures of up to +20.1 °C (mean kinetic temperature). The effect was maintained for at least 52.5 h.
LanguageEnglish
Pages89-92
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Pharmaceutics
Volume346
Issue number1-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2008

Fingerprint

Hospital Distribution Systems
Clinical Trials, Phase I
Temperature
Dry Ice
Appointments and Schedules
Industry

Keywords

  • phase I
  • frozen
  • dry ice
  • distribution
  • frozen shipping environment
  • clinical trial distribution
  • pharmacology

Cite this

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title = "Maintaining a frozen shipping environment for Phase I clinical trial distribution",
abstract = "The need for stringent temperature control provides significant challenges to pharmaceutical distributors operating in all sectors of the industry. Products with a frozen storage label requirement can be significantly problematic. This study aimed to provide evidence of robust and reproducible frozen shipment arrangements to be operated by a Phase I clinical trial unit. Dry ice was used to achieve a deep frozen internal parcel environment and was tested in a laboratory setting using ultra low temperature loggers within dummy product packs within the test parcels. The laboratory dry ice packing configuration was then repeatedly tested in real time transits using a Glasgow to London delivery schedule. An internal temperature specification was set to not exceed −10 °C during the transport. During each delivery, external temperature monitoring measured the temperature stress experienced by the box in transit. Results demonstrated the ability of the chosen system to not exceed −13.6 °C on average (−10 °C maximum) when exposed to external temperatures of up to +20.1 °C (mean kinetic temperature). The effect was maintained for at least 52.5 h.",
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