Local consumption and territorial based accounting for CO2 emissions

Kristinn Hermannsson, Stuart McIntyre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We examine the complications involved in attributing emissions at a local level. Specifically, we look at how functional specialisation within a city region can, via trade between sub-regions, create emissions interdependencies; and how this complicates environmental policy implementation in an analogous manner to international trade at the national level. For this purpose we use a 3-region emissions extended input–output model of the Glasgow City region (2 regions: city and wider city-region) and the rest of Scotland. The model utilises data on household consumption to account for consumption flows across sub-regions and plant-level data on emissions from electricity generation to augment the top-down disaggregation of emissions. This enables a carbon attribution at the sub-regional level, which is used to analyse emissions interdependencies within the city-region.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1-11
Number of pages11
JournalEcological Economics
Volume104
Early online date16 May 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2014

Fingerprint

policy implementation
consumption
CO2 emissions
electricity generation
international trade
City-regions
environmental policy
city
carbon
Interdependencies
Environmental policy
Input-output model
Carbon
Household consumption
Top-down
Attribution
Policy implementation
Disaggregation
Electricity generation
Scotland

Keywords

  • CO2 emissions
  • city region
  • metropolitan area
  • environmental accounting
  • regional interdependency

Cite this

@article{34449db186634454be4c0345318a220c,
title = "Local consumption and territorial based accounting for CO2 emissions",
abstract = "We examine the complications involved in attributing emissions at a local level. Specifically, we look at how functional specialisation within a city region can, via trade between sub-regions, create emissions interdependencies; and how this complicates environmental policy implementation in an analogous manner to international trade at the national level. For this purpose we use a 3-region emissions extended input–output model of the Glasgow City region (2 regions: city and wider city-region) and the rest of Scotland. The model utilises data on household consumption to account for consumption flows across sub-regions and plant-level data on emissions from electricity generation to augment the top-down disaggregation of emissions. This enables a carbon attribution at the sub-regional level, which is used to analyse emissions interdependencies within the city-region.",
keywords = "CO2 emissions, city region, metropolitan area, environmental accounting, regional interdependency",
author = "Kristinn Hermannsson and Stuart McIntyre",
year = "2014",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1016/j.ecolecon.2014.04.020",
language = "English",
volume = "104",
pages = "1--11",
journal = "Ecological Economics",
issn = "0921-8009",

}

Local consumption and territorial based accounting for CO2 emissions. / Hermannsson, Kristinn; McIntyre, Stuart.

In: Ecological Economics, Vol. 104, 08.2014, p. 1-11.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Local consumption and territorial based accounting for CO2 emissions

AU - Hermannsson, Kristinn

AU - McIntyre, Stuart

PY - 2014/8

Y1 - 2014/8

N2 - We examine the complications involved in attributing emissions at a local level. Specifically, we look at how functional specialisation within a city region can, via trade between sub-regions, create emissions interdependencies; and how this complicates environmental policy implementation in an analogous manner to international trade at the national level. For this purpose we use a 3-region emissions extended input–output model of the Glasgow City region (2 regions: city and wider city-region) and the rest of Scotland. The model utilises data on household consumption to account for consumption flows across sub-regions and plant-level data on emissions from electricity generation to augment the top-down disaggregation of emissions. This enables a carbon attribution at the sub-regional level, which is used to analyse emissions interdependencies within the city-region.

AB - We examine the complications involved in attributing emissions at a local level. Specifically, we look at how functional specialisation within a city region can, via trade between sub-regions, create emissions interdependencies; and how this complicates environmental policy implementation in an analogous manner to international trade at the national level. For this purpose we use a 3-region emissions extended input–output model of the Glasgow City region (2 regions: city and wider city-region) and the rest of Scotland. The model utilises data on household consumption to account for consumption flows across sub-regions and plant-level data on emissions from electricity generation to augment the top-down disaggregation of emissions. This enables a carbon attribution at the sub-regional level, which is used to analyse emissions interdependencies within the city-region.

KW - CO2 emissions

KW - city region

KW - metropolitan area

KW - environmental accounting

KW - regional interdependency

U2 - 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2014.04.020

DO - 10.1016/j.ecolecon.2014.04.020

M3 - Article

VL - 104

SP - 1

EP - 11

JO - Ecological Economics

T2 - Ecological Economics

JF - Ecological Economics

SN - 0921-8009

ER -