Living with others inside the self: decolonising transplantation, selfhood and the body politic in Nalo Hopkinson's Brown Girl in the Ring

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)
11 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This article examines anxieties concerning organtransplantation in Nalo Hopkinson’s prize-winning novel Brown Girl in the Ring (1998). The main focus is how this novel re-imagines subjectivity and selfhood as an embodied metaphor for the recon!guring of broader sociopolitical relations. In other words, this article analyses the relationship between the transplanted body and the body politic, arguing that a post-transplant
identity, where there is little separation between donor and recipient, is the foundation for a politics based on responsibility for others. Such a responsibility poses a challenge to the race and class segregation that is integral to the post-apocalyptic world of Hopkinson’s novel. Transplantation is not a utopian vision of an egalitarian society coming together in one body; rather, this biotechnological intervention offers a potentially different mode of thinking what it means to work across race, class and embodied division, while always recalling the violence that might facilitate so-called medical progress.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)252–258
Number of pages7
JournalMedical Humanities
Volume42
Issue number4
Early online date3 Oct 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Nov 2016

Keywords

  • organ transplantation
  • Nalo Hopkinson
  • Caribbean colonialism
  • Canadian politics
  • the body politic

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Living with others inside the self: decolonising transplantation, selfhood and the body politic in Nalo Hopkinson's Brown Girl in the Ring'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this