Learning from accidents: investigating the genesis of human errors in multi-attribute settings to improve the organisation of design

R. Moura, M. Beer, E. Patelli, J. Lewis, F. Knoll

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

Abstract

Remarkable advances in engineering and system controls in recent times and the consequent development of state-of-the-art technologies are clearly resulting in economic, environmental and safety benefits to the society. Latest disasters, however, put human error in the glare of the media spotlight. The February 2016 train collision in southern Bavaria, Germany, which took 11 lives and left more than 90 people injured, is one of several examples where human errors appear to have played a significant role in a major accident. In this emblematic case, the railway system had multiple safety barriers in place, such as an automatic braking system if a train crosses a stop signal, but the track controller had reportedly disabled it. When he realised the error and tried to warn the drivers, it was too late (BBC, 2016).

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationRisk, Reliability and Safety
Subtitle of host publicationInnovating Theory and Practice - Proceedings of the 26th European Safety and Reliability Conference, ESREL 2016
EditorsLesley Walls, Matthew Revie, Tim Bedford
Place of PublicationLondon
Chapter2.8
Number of pages8
Publication statusPublished - 13 Sep 2016
Event26th European Safety and Reliability Conference, ESREL 2016 - Glasgow, United Kingdom
Duration: 25 Sep 201629 Sep 2016

Conference

Conference26th European Safety and Reliability Conference, ESREL 2016
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityGlasgow
Period25/09/1629/09/16

Keywords

  • major accidents
  • industrial accidents
  • accident data

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