Learning complex sequences: No role for observation?

Steve Kelly, A. Burton

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Two experiments examined performance in a sequence learning task. Participants were trained on a repeating sequence which was presented as a visual display and learning was measured via the increase in reaction time to respond to a new sequence. Some participants made a response to each stimulus while others merely observed the sequence. In Experiment 1 participants responding to the display via a keypress showed learning, but those merely observing did not. Five possible reasons for the failure to find observational learning were considered and the Experiment 2 attempted to resolve these. This second experiment confirmed the findings of Experiment 1 in a non-spatial sequence display using a cover story which encouraged attention to the display but not rule-search strategies. The results are discussed in relation to applied and theoretical aspects of implicit learning.
LanguageEnglish
Pages15-23
Number of pages8
JournalPsychological Research
Volume65
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2001

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Observation
Learning
Reaction Time
Experiment

Keywords

  • learning
  • educational psychology

Cite this

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Learning complex sequences: No role for observation? / Kelly, Steve; Burton, A.

In: Psychological Research, Vol. 65, No. 1, 2001, p. 15-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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