Labor Market Adjustment, Social Spending and the Automatic Stabilizers in the OECD

Julia Darby, Jacques Melitz

Research output: Working paperDiscussion paper

Abstract

The macroeconomic literature on automatic stabilization tends to focus on taxes and dismiss the relevance of government expenditure, aside from unemployment compensation. Our results go sharply contrary to this view. We engage in an empirical analysis of 20 OECD countries from 1980-2001 and find that age- and health-related social expenditure as well as incapacity benefits all react to the cycle in a stabilizing manner. While possibly new in the macro literature, this conforms to many results in studies of labor and health. Moreover, when the focus is on the ratio of the net surplus to output, automatic stabilization comes essentially from the spending side. Taxes contribute nothing at all.
LanguageEnglish
Place of PublicationGlasgow
PublisherUniversity of Strathclyde
Pages1-40
Number of pages41
Volume07
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2007

Fingerprint

Social spending
Automatic stabilizers
Health
Stabilization
Labour market adjustment
Tax
Labor
Unemployment compensation
Empirical analysis
Government expenditure
Expenditure
Macroeconomics
OECD countries
Surplus

Keywords

  • automatic stabilization
  • discretionary fiscal policy
  • cyclically adjusted budget balances

Cite this

Darby, J., & Melitz, J. (2007). Labor Market Adjustment, Social Spending and the Automatic Stabilizers in the OECD. (02 ed.) (pp. 1-40). Glasgow: University of Strathclyde.
Darby, Julia ; Melitz, Jacques. / Labor Market Adjustment, Social Spending and the Automatic Stabilizers in the OECD. 02. ed. Glasgow : University of Strathclyde, 2007. pp. 1-40
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Darby, J & Melitz, J 2007 'Labor Market Adjustment, Social Spending and the Automatic Stabilizers in the OECD' 02 edn, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, pp. 1-40.

Labor Market Adjustment, Social Spending and the Automatic Stabilizers in the OECD. / Darby, Julia; Melitz, Jacques.

02. ed. Glasgow : University of Strathclyde, 2007. p. 1-40.

Research output: Working paperDiscussion paper

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Darby J, Melitz J. Labor Market Adjustment, Social Spending and the Automatic Stabilizers in the OECD. 02 ed. Glasgow: University of Strathclyde. 2007 Feb, p. 1-40.