Knowledge, awareness and practice of the importance of hand-washing amongst children attending state run primary schools in rural Malawi

Anthony Grimason, Salule Joseph Masangwi, Tracy Morse, George Christopher Jabu, Tara Beattie, Steven E. Taulo, Kingsley Lungu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A study was undertaken to determine the efficacy of hygiene practices in 2 primary schools in Malawi. The study determined: (1) presence of Escherichia coli on the hands of 126 primary school pupils, (2) knowledge, awareness and hygiene practices amongst pupils and teachers and (3) the school environment through observation. Pupil appreciation of hygiene issues was reasonable; however, the high percentage presence of E. coli on hands (71%) and the evidence of large-scale open defaecation in school grounds revealed that apparent knowledge was not put into practice. The standard of facilities for sanitation and hygiene did not significantly impact on the level of knowledge or percentage of school children's hands harbouring faecal bacteria. Evidence from pupils and teachers indicated a poor understanding of principles of disease transmission. Latrines and hand-washing facilities constructed were not child friendly. This study identifies a multidisciplinary approach to improve sanitation and hygiene practices within schools.

LanguageEnglish
Pages31-43
Number of pages13
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Health Research
Volume24
Issue number1
Early online date11 Apr 2013
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014

Fingerprint

Malawi
Hand Disinfection
Sanitation
Hygiene
Washing
Escherichia coli
Pupil
Hand
Bacteria
Toilet Facilities
Defecation
Observation

Keywords

  • knowledge
  • awareness
  • hand washing
  • children
  • primary schools
  • rural malawi
  • sanitation and hygiene practices
  • faecal bacteria
  • E. coli
  • defaecation

Cite this

Grimason, Anthony ; Masangwi, Salule Joseph ; Morse, Tracy ; Jabu, George Christopher ; Beattie, Tara ; Taulo, Steven E. ; Lungu, Kingsley. / Knowledge, awareness and practice of the importance of hand-washing amongst children attending state run primary schools in rural Malawi. In: International Journal of Environmental Health Research. 2014 ; Vol. 24, No. 1. pp. 31-43.
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Knowledge, awareness and practice of the importance of hand-washing amongst children attending state run primary schools in rural Malawi. / Grimason, Anthony; Masangwi, Salule Joseph; Morse, Tracy; Jabu, George Christopher; Beattie, Tara; Taulo, Steven E.; Lungu, Kingsley.

In: International Journal of Environmental Health Research, Vol. 24, No. 1, 2014, p. 31-43.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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