Joining up working

Elspeth McCartney

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

Abstract

Terms for models of co-professional working are at times used interchangeably in policy documents, but definitions for ‘named types’ do exist. A classification framework is outlined, and discussed. The models that may be used are influenced by the structures within which staff work and the ease with which co-professional contact can be made. Integrated services will require to make decisions about the models they intend to foster, but resource limits will play a part. Options are discussed with reference to speech and language therapists and teachers working together, which provides a long-established and well-researched example, and the practical need for ‘good enough’ models of co-working is stressed.
LanguageEnglish
Title of host publicationThe Research and Policy Discourses of Service Integration, Interprofessional and Interagency Working
Subtitle of host publicationEconomic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Seminar 1 Proceedings
EditorsJ. Forbes
Pages33-51
Number of pages19
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2006

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speech
decision
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Keywords

  • therapy framework
  • foster care

Cite this

McCartney, E. (2006). Joining up working. In J. Forbes (Ed.), The Research and Policy Discourses of Service Integration, Interprofessional and Interagency Working: Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Seminar 1 Proceedings (pp. 33-51)
McCartney, Elspeth. / Joining up working. The Research and Policy Discourses of Service Integration, Interprofessional and Interagency Working: Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Seminar 1 Proceedings. editor / J. Forbes. 2006. pp. 33-51
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McCartney, E 2006, Joining up working. in J Forbes (ed.), The Research and Policy Discourses of Service Integration, Interprofessional and Interagency Working: Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Seminar 1 Proceedings. pp. 33-51.

Joining up working. / McCartney, Elspeth.

The Research and Policy Discourses of Service Integration, Interprofessional and Interagency Working: Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Seminar 1 Proceedings. ed. / J. Forbes. 2006. p. 33-51.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution book

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McCartney E. Joining up working. In Forbes J, editor, The Research and Policy Discourses of Service Integration, Interprofessional and Interagency Working: Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) Seminar 1 Proceedings. 2006. p. 33-51