La Duse, Aleramo et Serao spectatrices de la scène et du cinéma italiens au tournant du XXe siècle: rencontres parisiennes

Translated title of the contribution: Italian Stage and Screen Spectators at the Turn of the Twentieth Century and Parisian Encounters: Duse, Aleramo, Serao

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter (peer-reviewed)peer-review

Abstract

Drawing on recent work in feminist film theory on spectatorship that rejects Laura Mulvey’s masculinization of the spectator position in favour of a female spectatorial pleasure, in this essay I focus on the spectatorship of three Italian, internationally celebrated women performers and writers who encountered Paris in their careers. Whether they did so in the imaginary through the performance of a role adapted for the Italian stage or screen, or in person through the staging of a play there, my contention is that their star personae as spectators embodied a continuum of intergenerational, mobile, southern-European cosmopolitanism-in-the-making, and offered their female readers and spectators a means to be self-conscious, engaged spectators themselves. These well-known writers and artists spanned two generations and were known for their acclaimed performances and/or writings. In my analysis of evidence in their autobiographical fiction, diary entries, autobiography, and reportage, I lay bare accounts of admiration and female solidarity among women which typified a particular historical moment in Italy’s past; namely, a burgeoning female culture industry on stage and screen, which was at its most productive and vibrant in the period prior to the onset of fascism.
Translated title of the contributionItalian Stage and Screen Spectators at the Turn of the Twentieth Century and Parisian Encounters: Duse, Aleramo, Serao
Original languageFrench
Title of host publicationSpettatrices!
Subtitle of host publicationLa femme au spectacle de l’Antiquité à nos jours
Place of PublicationParis
Number of pages10
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 28 Feb 2021

Keywords

  • feminist film theory
  • Italian cinema
  • facism

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