It hurts!: Investigating the Aesthetic Strategies of Four Novels by Kathy Acker

Kevin O'Neill

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

Abstract

The moral outrage that suffused Western media from Stockhausen's analogue of catastrophic destruction with aesthetic innovation--a relation at the heart of this inquiry--at once signals and yields insight into the dimensions of a new sociocultural paradigm that has arisen since the World Trade Center attacks: what Baudrillard in effect describes as a culture of terrorism. It also provides a useful lens through which critical questions about intersections of language and power--specifically how Western hegemony is shaped and disseminated by normative narratives--can be refrained in a post 9/11 context. Indeed, while the dispute about Stockhausen's statement continues to remain centered on questions of representation (i.e., what was said vs. what was meant), little consideration has been given to why an aesthetic evaluation of a terrorist act catapulted a musician into the political limelight. Why and how did Stockhausen's statement create such an impact? What does the public's reaction to his choice of language reveal about normative interpretive models and the discursive operations that are at work to corral them into shape?
Original languageEnglish
Awarding Institution
  • University Of Strathclyde
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2007

Fingerprint

Karlheinz Stockhausen
Aesthetics
Kathy Acker
Novel
Language
Outrage
Limelight
Jean Baudrillard
Terrorism
Musicians
Destruction
Innovation
September 11 Attacks
Terrorist
Hegemony
Evaluation
World Trade Center
Dispute
Paradigm
Discursive

Keywords

  • aesthetics
  • literature
  • critical analysis
  • novels

Cite this

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title = "It hurts!: Investigating the Aesthetic Strategies of Four Novels by Kathy Acker",
abstract = "The moral outrage that suffused Western media from Stockhausen's analogue of catastrophic destruction with aesthetic innovation--a relation at the heart of this inquiry--at once signals and yields insight into the dimensions of a new sociocultural paradigm that has arisen since the World Trade Center attacks: what Baudrillard in effect describes as a culture of terrorism. It also provides a useful lens through which critical questions about intersections of language and power--specifically how Western hegemony is shaped and disseminated by normative narratives--can be refrained in a post 9/11 context. Indeed, while the dispute about Stockhausen's statement continues to remain centered on questions of representation (i.e., what was said vs. what was meant), little consideration has been given to why an aesthetic evaluation of a terrorist act catapulted a musician into the political limelight. Why and how did Stockhausen's statement create such an impact? What does the public's reaction to his choice of language reveal about normative interpretive models and the discursive operations that are at work to corral them into shape?",
keywords = "aesthetics, literature, critical analysis, novels",
author = "Kevin O'Neill",
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It hurts!: Investigating the Aesthetic Strategies of Four Novels by Kathy Acker. / O'Neill, Kevin.

2007. 68 p.

Research output: ThesisDoctoral Thesis

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AU - O'Neill, Kevin

PY - 2007/9

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N2 - The moral outrage that suffused Western media from Stockhausen's analogue of catastrophic destruction with aesthetic innovation--a relation at the heart of this inquiry--at once signals and yields insight into the dimensions of a new sociocultural paradigm that has arisen since the World Trade Center attacks: what Baudrillard in effect describes as a culture of terrorism. It also provides a useful lens through which critical questions about intersections of language and power--specifically how Western hegemony is shaped and disseminated by normative narratives--can be refrained in a post 9/11 context. Indeed, while the dispute about Stockhausen's statement continues to remain centered on questions of representation (i.e., what was said vs. what was meant), little consideration has been given to why an aesthetic evaluation of a terrorist act catapulted a musician into the political limelight. Why and how did Stockhausen's statement create such an impact? What does the public's reaction to his choice of language reveal about normative interpretive models and the discursive operations that are at work to corral them into shape?

AB - The moral outrage that suffused Western media from Stockhausen's analogue of catastrophic destruction with aesthetic innovation--a relation at the heart of this inquiry--at once signals and yields insight into the dimensions of a new sociocultural paradigm that has arisen since the World Trade Center attacks: what Baudrillard in effect describes as a culture of terrorism. It also provides a useful lens through which critical questions about intersections of language and power--specifically how Western hegemony is shaped and disseminated by normative narratives--can be refrained in a post 9/11 context. Indeed, while the dispute about Stockhausen's statement continues to remain centered on questions of representation (i.e., what was said vs. what was meant), little consideration has been given to why an aesthetic evaluation of a terrorist act catapulted a musician into the political limelight. Why and how did Stockhausen's statement create such an impact? What does the public's reaction to his choice of language reveal about normative interpretive models and the discursive operations that are at work to corral them into shape?

KW - aesthetics

KW - literature

KW - critical analysis

KW - novels

M3 - Doctoral Thesis

ER -