It doesn't matter what you teach?

J. Bebbington, Ian Thomson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

There has been from time to time [see, for example, Adv. Public Interest Acc. 2 (1988) 71; Acc. Org. Society 16 (1991) 333; Acc. Educ. 3 (1994) 51; Acc. Aud. Accountability J. 8 (1995) 97; Crit. Perspect. Acc. 10 (1999) 833; Crit. Perspect. Acc. 12 (2001) 471] concern expressed about the state of accounting education and its potential link to the broader critical accounting project. This special issue revisits this theme focusing on the managerial undercurrent of accounting undergraduate education. This paper seeks to contribute to this debate by posing the suggestion/question that how one teaches is equally important as considering what you teach. In exploring the 'how' of teaching approaches, two educational theorists are drawn from Ivan Illich and Paulo Freire. In particular, we develop the idea that the 'hidden curriculum' [Deschooling Society, Calder and Boyars, London, 1971] of accounting education may be uncovered and problematized if one uses a dialogical approach to education [Pedagogy of the Oppressed, Pelican, London, 1996]. In seeking to expound our thesis, we draw from a number of teaching experiments which have explicitly sought to introduce more dialogical approaches to UK undergraduate accounting education.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)609-628
Number of pages19
JournalCritical Perspectives On Accounting
Volume15
Issue number4-5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2004

Keywords

  • accounting education
  • dialogic
  • problem posing
  • UK
  • pedagogy
  • hidden curriculum

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'It doesn't matter what you teach?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this