Is use of a psychological workbook associated with improved disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand scores in patients with distal radius fracture?

Stuart Goudie, Diane Dixon, Gail McMillan, David Ring, Margaret McQueen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Symptom intensity and magnitude of limitations correlate with stress, distress, and less effective coping strategies. It is unclear if interventions to target these factors can be used to improve outcomes after distal radius fracture in either the short- or longer term.

QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: (1) Are there any factors (including the use of a workbook aimed at optimizing psychological response to injury, demographic, radiographic, medical, or psychosocial) associated with improved Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and Numerical Rating Scale pain (NRS pain) scores at 6 weeks after management of distal radius fracture? (2) Are any of these factors associated with improved DASH and NRS pain scores at 6 months after management of distal radius fracture?

METHODS: We conducted a double-blind randomized controlled trial comparing a workbook designed to optimize rehabilitation by improving psychological response to injury using recognized psychological techniques (the LEARN technique and goal setting) versus a workbook containing details of stretching exercises in the otherwise routine management of distal radius fracture. Patients older than 18 years of age with an isolated distal radius fracture were recruited within 3 weeks of injury from a single academic teaching hospital between March and August 2016. During recruitment, 191 patients who met the inclusion criteria were approached; 52 (27%) declined participation and 139 were enrolled. Eight patients (6%) were lost to followup by 6 weeks. The remaining cohort of 129 patients was included in the analysis. DASH scores and NRS pain scores were recorded at 6 weeks and 6 months after injury. Multivariable regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with outcome scores.

RESULTS: At 6 weeks after distal radius fracture, when compared with an information-only workbook, use of a psychologic workbook was not associated with improved DASH (workbook DASH: 38 [range, 21-48]; control DASH: 35 [range, 21-53]; difference of medians: 3; p = 0.949) nor NRS pain scores (workbook NRS: 3 [range, 1-5]; control NRS: 2 [range, 1-4]; difference of medians: 1; p = 0.128). Improved DASH scores were associated with less radial shortening (β = 0.2, p = 0.009), less dorsal tilt (β = 0.2, p = 0.035), and nonoperative treatment (β = 0.2, p = 0.027). Improved NRS pain scores were associated with nonoperative treatment (β = 0.2, p = 0.021) and no posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (β = 0.2, p = 0.046). At 6 months, use of a psychologic workbook was not associated with improved DASH (workbook DASH: 11 [range, 5-28]; control DASH: 11 [range, 3-20]; difference of medians: 0; p = 0.367) nor NRS pain scores (workbook NRS: 1 [range, 0-2]; control NRS: 1 [range, 0-2]; difference of medians: 0; p = 0.704). Improved DASH score at 6 months was associated with having fewer medical comorbidities (β = 0.3, p < 0.001) and lower enrollment PTSD (β = 0.3, p < 0.011). Lower NRS pain scores at 6 months were associated with having fewer medical comorbidities (β = 0.2, p = 0.045), lower enrollment PTSD (β = 0.3, p = 0.008), and lower enrollment Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (β = 0.2, p = 0.042).

CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrates that there is no benefit from the untargeted use of a psychological workbook based on the LEARN approach and goal-setting strategies in patients with distal radius fracture. Future research should investigate if there is a subgroup of patients with a negative psychological response to injury that benefits from psychological intervention and, if so, how best to identify these patients and intervene.

LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level II, therapeutic study.

LanguageEnglish
Pages832-845
Number of pages14
JournalClinical Orthopaedics and Related Research
Volume476
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Apr 2018

Fingerprint

Radius Fractures
Arm
Hand
Psychology
Pain
Post-Traumatic Stress Disorders
Wounds and Injuries
Comorbidity
Psychological Techniques
Teaching Hospitals
Therapeutics
Rehabilitation
Randomized Controlled Trials
Regression Analysis
Demography

Keywords

  • distal radius fracture
  • symptom intensity
  • psychological response to injury

Cite this

@article{9449bc1d899c4f769fe02b20b08c5cfb,
title = "Is use of a psychological workbook associated with improved disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand scores in patients with distal radius fracture?",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Symptom intensity and magnitude of limitations correlate with stress, distress, and less effective coping strategies. It is unclear if interventions to target these factors can be used to improve outcomes after distal radius fracture in either the short- or longer term.QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: (1) Are there any factors (including the use of a workbook aimed at optimizing psychological response to injury, demographic, radiographic, medical, or psychosocial) associated with improved Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and Numerical Rating Scale pain (NRS pain) scores at 6 weeks after management of distal radius fracture? (2) Are any of these factors associated with improved DASH and NRS pain scores at 6 months after management of distal radius fracture?METHODS: We conducted a double-blind randomized controlled trial comparing a workbook designed to optimize rehabilitation by improving psychological response to injury using recognized psychological techniques (the LEARN technique and goal setting) versus a workbook containing details of stretching exercises in the otherwise routine management of distal radius fracture. Patients older than 18 years of age with an isolated distal radius fracture were recruited within 3 weeks of injury from a single academic teaching hospital between March and August 2016. During recruitment, 191 patients who met the inclusion criteria were approached; 52 (27{\%}) declined participation and 139 were enrolled. Eight patients (6{\%}) were lost to followup by 6 weeks. The remaining cohort of 129 patients was included in the analysis. DASH scores and NRS pain scores were recorded at 6 weeks and 6 months after injury. Multivariable regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with outcome scores.RESULTS: At 6 weeks after distal radius fracture, when compared with an information-only workbook, use of a psychologic workbook was not associated with improved DASH (workbook DASH: 38 [range, 21-48]; control DASH: 35 [range, 21-53]; difference of medians: 3; p = 0.949) nor NRS pain scores (workbook NRS: 3 [range, 1-5]; control NRS: 2 [range, 1-4]; difference of medians: 1; p = 0.128). Improved DASH scores were associated with less radial shortening (β = 0.2, p = 0.009), less dorsal tilt (β = 0.2, p = 0.035), and nonoperative treatment (β = 0.2, p = 0.027). Improved NRS pain scores were associated with nonoperative treatment (β = 0.2, p = 0.021) and no posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (β = 0.2, p = 0.046). At 6 months, use of a psychologic workbook was not associated with improved DASH (workbook DASH: 11 [range, 5-28]; control DASH: 11 [range, 3-20]; difference of medians: 0; p = 0.367) nor NRS pain scores (workbook NRS: 1 [range, 0-2]; control NRS: 1 [range, 0-2]; difference of medians: 0; p = 0.704). Improved DASH score at 6 months was associated with having fewer medical comorbidities (β = 0.3, p < 0.001) and lower enrollment PTSD (β = 0.3, p < 0.011). Lower NRS pain scores at 6 months were associated with having fewer medical comorbidities (β = 0.2, p = 0.045), lower enrollment PTSD (β = 0.3, p = 0.008), and lower enrollment Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (β = 0.2, p = 0.042).CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrates that there is no benefit from the untargeted use of a psychological workbook based on the LEARN approach and goal-setting strategies in patients with distal radius fracture. Future research should investigate if there is a subgroup of patients with a negative psychological response to injury that benefits from psychological intervention and, if so, how best to identify these patients and intervene.LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level II, therapeutic study.",
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Is use of a psychological workbook associated with improved disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand scores in patients with distal radius fracture? / Goudie, Stuart; Dixon, Diane; McMillan, Gail; Ring, David; McQueen, Margaret.

In: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, Vol. 476, No. 4, 01.04.2018, p. 832-845.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Is use of a psychological workbook associated with improved disabilities of the arm, shoulder and hand scores in patients with distal radius fracture?

AU - Goudie, Stuart

AU - Dixon, Diane

AU - McMillan, Gail

AU - Ring, David

AU - McQueen, Margaret

PY - 2018/4/1

Y1 - 2018/4/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Symptom intensity and magnitude of limitations correlate with stress, distress, and less effective coping strategies. It is unclear if interventions to target these factors can be used to improve outcomes after distal radius fracture in either the short- or longer term.QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: (1) Are there any factors (including the use of a workbook aimed at optimizing psychological response to injury, demographic, radiographic, medical, or psychosocial) associated with improved Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and Numerical Rating Scale pain (NRS pain) scores at 6 weeks after management of distal radius fracture? (2) Are any of these factors associated with improved DASH and NRS pain scores at 6 months after management of distal radius fracture?METHODS: We conducted a double-blind randomized controlled trial comparing a workbook designed to optimize rehabilitation by improving psychological response to injury using recognized psychological techniques (the LEARN technique and goal setting) versus a workbook containing details of stretching exercises in the otherwise routine management of distal radius fracture. Patients older than 18 years of age with an isolated distal radius fracture were recruited within 3 weeks of injury from a single academic teaching hospital between March and August 2016. During recruitment, 191 patients who met the inclusion criteria were approached; 52 (27%) declined participation and 139 were enrolled. Eight patients (6%) were lost to followup by 6 weeks. The remaining cohort of 129 patients was included in the analysis. DASH scores and NRS pain scores were recorded at 6 weeks and 6 months after injury. Multivariable regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with outcome scores.RESULTS: At 6 weeks after distal radius fracture, when compared with an information-only workbook, use of a psychologic workbook was not associated with improved DASH (workbook DASH: 38 [range, 21-48]; control DASH: 35 [range, 21-53]; difference of medians: 3; p = 0.949) nor NRS pain scores (workbook NRS: 3 [range, 1-5]; control NRS: 2 [range, 1-4]; difference of medians: 1; p = 0.128). Improved DASH scores were associated with less radial shortening (β = 0.2, p = 0.009), less dorsal tilt (β = 0.2, p = 0.035), and nonoperative treatment (β = 0.2, p = 0.027). Improved NRS pain scores were associated with nonoperative treatment (β = 0.2, p = 0.021) and no posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (β = 0.2, p = 0.046). At 6 months, use of a psychologic workbook was not associated with improved DASH (workbook DASH: 11 [range, 5-28]; control DASH: 11 [range, 3-20]; difference of medians: 0; p = 0.367) nor NRS pain scores (workbook NRS: 1 [range, 0-2]; control NRS: 1 [range, 0-2]; difference of medians: 0; p = 0.704). Improved DASH score at 6 months was associated with having fewer medical comorbidities (β = 0.3, p < 0.001) and lower enrollment PTSD (β = 0.3, p < 0.011). Lower NRS pain scores at 6 months were associated with having fewer medical comorbidities (β = 0.2, p = 0.045), lower enrollment PTSD (β = 0.3, p = 0.008), and lower enrollment Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (β = 0.2, p = 0.042).CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrates that there is no benefit from the untargeted use of a psychological workbook based on the LEARN approach and goal-setting strategies in patients with distal radius fracture. Future research should investigate if there is a subgroup of patients with a negative psychological response to injury that benefits from psychological intervention and, if so, how best to identify these patients and intervene.LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level II, therapeutic study.

AB - BACKGROUND: Symptom intensity and magnitude of limitations correlate with stress, distress, and less effective coping strategies. It is unclear if interventions to target these factors can be used to improve outcomes after distal radius fracture in either the short- or longer term.QUESTIONS/PURPOSES: (1) Are there any factors (including the use of a workbook aimed at optimizing psychological response to injury, demographic, radiographic, medical, or psychosocial) associated with improved Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) and Numerical Rating Scale pain (NRS pain) scores at 6 weeks after management of distal radius fracture? (2) Are any of these factors associated with improved DASH and NRS pain scores at 6 months after management of distal radius fracture?METHODS: We conducted a double-blind randomized controlled trial comparing a workbook designed to optimize rehabilitation by improving psychological response to injury using recognized psychological techniques (the LEARN technique and goal setting) versus a workbook containing details of stretching exercises in the otherwise routine management of distal radius fracture. Patients older than 18 years of age with an isolated distal radius fracture were recruited within 3 weeks of injury from a single academic teaching hospital between March and August 2016. During recruitment, 191 patients who met the inclusion criteria were approached; 52 (27%) declined participation and 139 were enrolled. Eight patients (6%) were lost to followup by 6 weeks. The remaining cohort of 129 patients was included in the analysis. DASH scores and NRS pain scores were recorded at 6 weeks and 6 months after injury. Multivariable regression analysis was used to identify factors associated with outcome scores.RESULTS: At 6 weeks after distal radius fracture, when compared with an information-only workbook, use of a psychologic workbook was not associated with improved DASH (workbook DASH: 38 [range, 21-48]; control DASH: 35 [range, 21-53]; difference of medians: 3; p = 0.949) nor NRS pain scores (workbook NRS: 3 [range, 1-5]; control NRS: 2 [range, 1-4]; difference of medians: 1; p = 0.128). Improved DASH scores were associated with less radial shortening (β = 0.2, p = 0.009), less dorsal tilt (β = 0.2, p = 0.035), and nonoperative treatment (β = 0.2, p = 0.027). Improved NRS pain scores were associated with nonoperative treatment (β = 0.2, p = 0.021) and no posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (β = 0.2, p = 0.046). At 6 months, use of a psychologic workbook was not associated with improved DASH (workbook DASH: 11 [range, 5-28]; control DASH: 11 [range, 3-20]; difference of medians: 0; p = 0.367) nor NRS pain scores (workbook NRS: 1 [range, 0-2]; control NRS: 1 [range, 0-2]; difference of medians: 0; p = 0.704). Improved DASH score at 6 months was associated with having fewer medical comorbidities (β = 0.3, p < 0.001) and lower enrollment PTSD (β = 0.3, p < 0.011). Lower NRS pain scores at 6 months were associated with having fewer medical comorbidities (β = 0.2, p = 0.045), lower enrollment PTSD (β = 0.3, p = 0.008), and lower enrollment Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia (β = 0.2, p = 0.042).CONCLUSIONS: Our study demonstrates that there is no benefit from the untargeted use of a psychological workbook based on the LEARN approach and goal-setting strategies in patients with distal radius fracture. Future research should investigate if there is a subgroup of patients with a negative psychological response to injury that benefits from psychological intervention and, if so, how best to identify these patients and intervene.LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level II, therapeutic study.

KW - distal radius fracture

KW - symptom intensity

KW - psychological response to injury

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DO - 10.1007/s11999.0000000000000095

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JO - Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research

T2 - Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research

JF - Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research

SN - 0009-921X

IS - 4

ER -