Is there a relationship between airborne and surface microbes in the critical care environment?

J. Smith, C.A. Adams, M.F. King, C.J. Noakes, C. Robertson, S.J. Dancer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective This study attempted firstly to correlate environmental contamination of air and surfaces in the intensive care unit (ICU); and secondly, to examine any association between environmental contamination and ICU-acquired staphylococcal infection. Design We screened patients, air and surfaces on 10 sampling days in a mechanically ventilated 10-bed ICU during 10 months. Methods Near-patient hand-touch sites (n=500) and air (n=80) were screened for total colony count and Staphylococcus aureus using dipslides, settle plates (passive air sampling) and an MAS-100 slit-sampler (active air sampling). Air counts were compared with surface counts according to proposed standards for air and surface bioburden. Patients were monitored for ICU-acquired staphylococcal infection throughout. Results Overall, 235 of 500 (47%) surfaces failed the standard for aerobic counts (≤2.5 cfu/cm2). Half of passive air samples (20 of 40: 50%) failed the ‘Index of Microbial Air’ contamination (2 cfu/9cm plate/hr), and 15/40 (37.5%) active air samples failed the clean air standard (
LanguageEnglish
JournalJournal of Hospital Infection
Early online date9 Apr 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 9 Apr 2018

Fingerprint

Critical Care
Air
Count
Contamination
Unit
Infection
Intensive Care Units
Staphylococcal Infections
Correlate
Relationships
Touch
Standards
Staphylococcus aureus
Hand

Keywords

  • hospital acquired infection
  • hospital environment
  • bacterial transmission

Cite this

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title = "Is there a relationship between airborne and surface microbes in the critical care environment?",
abstract = "Objective This study attempted firstly to correlate environmental contamination of air and surfaces in the intensive care unit (ICU); and secondly, to examine any association between environmental contamination and ICU-acquired staphylococcal infection. Design We screened patients, air and surfaces on 10 sampling days in a mechanically ventilated 10-bed ICU during 10 months. Methods Near-patient hand-touch sites (n=500) and air (n=80) were screened for total colony count and Staphylococcus aureus using dipslides, settle plates (passive air sampling) and an MAS-100 slit-sampler (active air sampling). Air counts were compared with surface counts according to proposed standards for air and surface bioburden. Patients were monitored for ICU-acquired staphylococcal infection throughout. Results Overall, 235 of 500 (47{\%}) surfaces failed the standard for aerobic counts (≤2.5 cfu/cm2). Half of passive air samples (20 of 40: 50{\%}) failed the ‘Index of Microbial Air’ contamination (2 cfu/9cm plate/hr), and 15/40 (37.5{\%}) active air samples failed the clean air standard (",
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Is there a relationship between airborne and surface microbes in the critical care environment? / Smith, J.; Adams, C.A.; King, M.F.; Noakes, C.J.; Robertson, C.; Dancer, S.J.

In: Journal of Hospital Infection , 09.04.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Is there a relationship between airborne and surface microbes in the critical care environment?

AU - Smith, J.

AU - Adams, C.A.

AU - King, M.F.

AU - Noakes, C.J.

AU - Robertson, C.

AU - Dancer, S.J.

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Y1 - 2018/4/9

N2 - Objective This study attempted firstly to correlate environmental contamination of air and surfaces in the intensive care unit (ICU); and secondly, to examine any association between environmental contamination and ICU-acquired staphylococcal infection. Design We screened patients, air and surfaces on 10 sampling days in a mechanically ventilated 10-bed ICU during 10 months. Methods Near-patient hand-touch sites (n=500) and air (n=80) were screened for total colony count and Staphylococcus aureus using dipslides, settle plates (passive air sampling) and an MAS-100 slit-sampler (active air sampling). Air counts were compared with surface counts according to proposed standards for air and surface bioburden. Patients were monitored for ICU-acquired staphylococcal infection throughout. Results Overall, 235 of 500 (47%) surfaces failed the standard for aerobic counts (≤2.5 cfu/cm2). Half of passive air samples (20 of 40: 50%) failed the ‘Index of Microbial Air’ contamination (2 cfu/9cm plate/hr), and 15/40 (37.5%) active air samples failed the clean air standard (

AB - Objective This study attempted firstly to correlate environmental contamination of air and surfaces in the intensive care unit (ICU); and secondly, to examine any association between environmental contamination and ICU-acquired staphylococcal infection. Design We screened patients, air and surfaces on 10 sampling days in a mechanically ventilated 10-bed ICU during 10 months. Methods Near-patient hand-touch sites (n=500) and air (n=80) were screened for total colony count and Staphylococcus aureus using dipslides, settle plates (passive air sampling) and an MAS-100 slit-sampler (active air sampling). Air counts were compared with surface counts according to proposed standards for air and surface bioburden. Patients were monitored for ICU-acquired staphylococcal infection throughout. Results Overall, 235 of 500 (47%) surfaces failed the standard for aerobic counts (≤2.5 cfu/cm2). Half of passive air samples (20 of 40: 50%) failed the ‘Index of Microbial Air’ contamination (2 cfu/9cm plate/hr), and 15/40 (37.5%) active air samples failed the clean air standard (

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