Is the current BMI obesity classification appropriate for black and white postmenopausal women?

E. Evans, D.A. Rowe, S. Racette, E. McAuley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

66 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relation between body fatness (%Fat) and body mass index (BMI) and to evaluate the validity of the BMI standards for obesity established by the NIH in older black and white postmenopausal women.

RESEARCH METHODS: Height, weight, BMI, and %Fat, assessed by DXA, were determined for 296 healthy, independently living women ranging in age from 50 to 80 years (M+/-s.d.; 64.4+/-7.8 years).

RESULTS: Per NIH guidelines, 32% were classified as obese (> or = 30 kg/m2, mean BMI = 28.1+/-5.5 kg/m2). In contrast, using the %Fat criterion of 38% advocated by Lohman to define obesity, 47% of our sample was obese (mean %Fat=37.3+/-6.2%). A moderately high curvilinear relation existed between BMI and %Fat (R = 0.82, SEE = 3.57 %Fat, P<0.05). Race added meaningfully to the prediction of %Fat (P<0.05) such that for the same BMI, black women will have 1% lower body fatness than white women. Based on a %Fat > or = 38 as the criterion for obesity, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, performed separately by race, indicated that the currently accepted BMI cutpoint for obesity produced low sensitivity (69% and 61% for black and white women, respectively). Alternatively, BMI values > or = 28.4 kg/m2 for black women and > or = 26.9 kg/m2 for white women to define obesity maximized classification accuracy.

CONCLUSION: We conclude that current BMI categories may not be appropriate for identifying obesity among postmenopausal women. Furthermore, the relation between BMI and %Fat is different in black compared to white women but remains constant from the sixth through the eighth decade of life
LanguageEnglish
Pages837-843
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Obesity
Volume30
Early online date17 Jan 2006
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 30 May 2006

Fingerprint

Body Mass Index
Obesity
Fats
hydroquinone
ROC Curve
Guidelines
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • body mass index
  • fat percentage
  • postmenopausal women
  • receiver operating characteristic analysis
  • racial difference

Cite this

Evans, E. ; Rowe, D.A. ; Racette, S. ; McAuley, E. / Is the current BMI obesity classification appropriate for black and white postmenopausal women?. In: International Journal of Obesity. 2006 ; Vol. 30. pp. 837-843.
@article{a3acea1c19d64d6ea8f6edb3cbe2e27e,
title = "Is the current BMI obesity classification appropriate for black and white postmenopausal women?",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relation between body fatness ({\%}Fat) and body mass index (BMI) and to evaluate the validity of the BMI standards for obesity established by the NIH in older black and white postmenopausal women. RESEARCH METHODS: Height, weight, BMI, and {\%}Fat, assessed by DXA, were determined for 296 healthy, independently living women ranging in age from 50 to 80 years (M+/-s.d.; 64.4+/-7.8 years). RESULTS: Per NIH guidelines, 32{\%} were classified as obese (> or = 30 kg/m2, mean BMI = 28.1+/-5.5 kg/m2). In contrast, using the {\%}Fat criterion of 38{\%} advocated by Lohman to define obesity, 47{\%} of our sample was obese (mean {\%}Fat=37.3+/-6.2{\%}). A moderately high curvilinear relation existed between BMI and {\%}Fat (R = 0.82, SEE = 3.57 {\%}Fat, P<0.05). Race added meaningfully to the prediction of {\%}Fat (P<0.05) such that for the same BMI, black women will have 1{\%} lower body fatness than white women. Based on a {\%}Fat > or = 38 as the criterion for obesity, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, performed separately by race, indicated that the currently accepted BMI cutpoint for obesity produced low sensitivity (69{\%} and 61{\%} for black and white women, respectively). Alternatively, BMI values > or = 28.4 kg/m2 for black women and > or = 26.9 kg/m2 for white women to define obesity maximized classification accuracy. CONCLUSION: We conclude that current BMI categories may not be appropriate for identifying obesity among postmenopausal women. Furthermore, the relation between BMI and {\%}Fat is different in black compared to white women but remains constant from the sixth through the eighth decade of life",
keywords = "body mass index, fat percentage, postmenopausal women, receiver operating characteristic analysis, racial difference",
author = "E. Evans and D.A. Rowe and S. Racette and E. McAuley",
year = "2006",
month = "5",
day = "30",
doi = "10.1038/sj.ijo.0803208",
language = "English",
volume = "30",
pages = "837--843",
journal = "International Journal of Obesity",
issn = "0307-0565",

}

Is the current BMI obesity classification appropriate for black and white postmenopausal women? / Evans, E.; Rowe, D.A.; Racette, S.; McAuley, E.

In: International Journal of Obesity, Vol. 30, 30.05.2006, p. 837-843.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Is the current BMI obesity classification appropriate for black and white postmenopausal women?

AU - Evans, E.

AU - Rowe, D.A.

AU - Racette, S.

AU - McAuley, E.

PY - 2006/5/30

Y1 - 2006/5/30

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relation between body fatness (%Fat) and body mass index (BMI) and to evaluate the validity of the BMI standards for obesity established by the NIH in older black and white postmenopausal women. RESEARCH METHODS: Height, weight, BMI, and %Fat, assessed by DXA, were determined for 296 healthy, independently living women ranging in age from 50 to 80 years (M+/-s.d.; 64.4+/-7.8 years). RESULTS: Per NIH guidelines, 32% were classified as obese (> or = 30 kg/m2, mean BMI = 28.1+/-5.5 kg/m2). In contrast, using the %Fat criterion of 38% advocated by Lohman to define obesity, 47% of our sample was obese (mean %Fat=37.3+/-6.2%). A moderately high curvilinear relation existed between BMI and %Fat (R = 0.82, SEE = 3.57 %Fat, P<0.05). Race added meaningfully to the prediction of %Fat (P<0.05) such that for the same BMI, black women will have 1% lower body fatness than white women. Based on a %Fat > or = 38 as the criterion for obesity, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, performed separately by race, indicated that the currently accepted BMI cutpoint for obesity produced low sensitivity (69% and 61% for black and white women, respectively). Alternatively, BMI values > or = 28.4 kg/m2 for black women and > or = 26.9 kg/m2 for white women to define obesity maximized classification accuracy. CONCLUSION: We conclude that current BMI categories may not be appropriate for identifying obesity among postmenopausal women. Furthermore, the relation between BMI and %Fat is different in black compared to white women but remains constant from the sixth through the eighth decade of life

AB - OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relation between body fatness (%Fat) and body mass index (BMI) and to evaluate the validity of the BMI standards for obesity established by the NIH in older black and white postmenopausal women. RESEARCH METHODS: Height, weight, BMI, and %Fat, assessed by DXA, were determined for 296 healthy, independently living women ranging in age from 50 to 80 years (M+/-s.d.; 64.4+/-7.8 years). RESULTS: Per NIH guidelines, 32% were classified as obese (> or = 30 kg/m2, mean BMI = 28.1+/-5.5 kg/m2). In contrast, using the %Fat criterion of 38% advocated by Lohman to define obesity, 47% of our sample was obese (mean %Fat=37.3+/-6.2%). A moderately high curvilinear relation existed between BMI and %Fat (R = 0.82, SEE = 3.57 %Fat, P<0.05). Race added meaningfully to the prediction of %Fat (P<0.05) such that for the same BMI, black women will have 1% lower body fatness than white women. Based on a %Fat > or = 38 as the criterion for obesity, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis, performed separately by race, indicated that the currently accepted BMI cutpoint for obesity produced low sensitivity (69% and 61% for black and white women, respectively). Alternatively, BMI values > or = 28.4 kg/m2 for black women and > or = 26.9 kg/m2 for white women to define obesity maximized classification accuracy. CONCLUSION: We conclude that current BMI categories may not be appropriate for identifying obesity among postmenopausal women. Furthermore, the relation between BMI and %Fat is different in black compared to white women but remains constant from the sixth through the eighth decade of life

KW - body mass index

KW - fat percentage

KW - postmenopausal women

KW - receiver operating characteristic analysis

KW - racial difference

U2 - 10.1038/sj.ijo.0803208

DO - 10.1038/sj.ijo.0803208

M3 - Article

VL - 30

SP - 837

EP - 843

JO - International Journal of Obesity

T2 - International Journal of Obesity

JF - International Journal of Obesity

SN - 0307-0565

ER -