Is fatigue after a stroke associated with physical de-conditioning? A cross-sectional study in ambulatory stroke survivors

S.J. Lewis, A. Barugh, C.A. Grieg, D.H. Saunders, Claire Fitzsimons, S. Dinan-Young, Archie Young, Gillian E. Mead

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

28 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims to determine the relationship between a measure of fatigue and 2 indices of physical fitness, lower limb extensor power (LLEP) and walking economy. Design: This was a cross-sectional study of patients with stroke. Fatigue was assessed by vitality (VIT) score of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey version 2 (SF-36v2). LLEP of the unaffected limb was measured using a lower leg extensor power rig. Walking economy was calculated by measuring oxygen consumption (mL·kg–1·m–1) during walking at a comfortable speed. Bivariate analyses were performed relating VIT to indices of fitness. Multiple regression analyses were also performed and included age, sex, and either SF-36v2 emotional role function or SF-36v2 mental health, as predictors of VIT.Setting: Community setting.Participants: Participants (N=66; 36 men; mean age ± SD, 71.0±9.9y) were all community dwelling, had survived a stroke, were able to walk independently, and had completed their stroke rehabilitation. The main outcome measure is SF-36v2 (VIT), with walking economy and LLEP of the limb unaffected by the stroke being independent variables. Results: Walking economy was not significantly related to VIT (R=–.024, P=.86, n=60). LLEP was positively related to VIT in bivariate analysis (R=.38, P=.003, n=58). After controlling for age, sex, and SF-36 emotional role function (or SF-36v2 mental health if the extreme outlier was excluded), LLEP remained a significant predictor of VIT. Conclusions: We found an association between fatigue and reduced LLEP. If a larger study confirms these findings, it would support the need to develop and test interventions to increase LLEP as a treatment for fatigue after stroke.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)295-298
Number of pages4
JournalArchives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation
Volume92
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2011

Fingerprint

Fatigue
Survivors
Cross-Sectional Studies
Stroke
Lower Extremity
Walking
Mental Health
Extremities
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Independent Living
Physical Fitness
Power (Psychology)
Conditioning (Psychology)
Health Surveys
Oxygen Consumption
Leg
Regression Analysis

Keywords

  • stroke
  • fatigue
  • physical de-conditioning

Cite this

Lewis, S.J. ; Barugh, A. ; Grieg, C.A. ; Saunders, D.H. ; Fitzsimons, Claire ; Dinan-Young, S. ; Young, Archie ; Mead, Gillian E. / Is fatigue after a stroke associated with physical de-conditioning? A cross-sectional study in ambulatory stroke survivors. In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. 2011 ; Vol. 92, No. 2. pp. 295-298.
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Is fatigue after a stroke associated with physical de-conditioning? A cross-sectional study in ambulatory stroke survivors. / Lewis, S.J.; Barugh, A.; Grieg, C.A.; Saunders, D.H.; Fitzsimons, Claire; Dinan-Young, S.; Young, Archie; Mead, Gillian E.

In: Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Vol. 92, No. 2, 02.2011, p. 295-298.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T1 - Is fatigue after a stroke associated with physical de-conditioning? A cross-sectional study in ambulatory stroke survivors

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AU - Barugh, A.

AU - Grieg, C.A.

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AB - Aims to determine the relationship between a measure of fatigue and 2 indices of physical fitness, lower limb extensor power (LLEP) and walking economy. Design: This was a cross-sectional study of patients with stroke. Fatigue was assessed by vitality (VIT) score of the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey version 2 (SF-36v2). LLEP of the unaffected limb was measured using a lower leg extensor power rig. Walking economy was calculated by measuring oxygen consumption (mL·kg–1·m–1) during walking at a comfortable speed. Bivariate analyses were performed relating VIT to indices of fitness. Multiple regression analyses were also performed and included age, sex, and either SF-36v2 emotional role function or SF-36v2 mental health, as predictors of VIT.Setting: Community setting.Participants: Participants (N=66; 36 men; mean age ± SD, 71.0±9.9y) were all community dwelling, had survived a stroke, were able to walk independently, and had completed their stroke rehabilitation. The main outcome measure is SF-36v2 (VIT), with walking economy and LLEP of the limb unaffected by the stroke being independent variables. Results: Walking economy was not significantly related to VIT (R=–.024, P=.86, n=60). LLEP was positively related to VIT in bivariate analysis (R=.38, P=.003, n=58). After controlling for age, sex, and SF-36 emotional role function (or SF-36v2 mental health if the extreme outlier was excluded), LLEP remained a significant predictor of VIT. Conclusions: We found an association between fatigue and reduced LLEP. If a larger study confirms these findings, it would support the need to develop and test interventions to increase LLEP as a treatment for fatigue after stroke.

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