Investigating the use of Raman and immersion Raman spectroscopy for spectral histopathology of metastatic brain cancer and primary sites of origin

Leanne M. Fullwood, Graeme Clemens, Dave Griffiths, Katherine Ashton, Timothy P. Dawson, Robert W. Lea, Charles Davis, Franck Bonnier, Hugh J. Byrne, Matthew J. Baker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is estimated that approximately 13000 people in the UK are diagnosed with brain cancer every year; of which 60% are metastatic. Current methods of diagnosis can be subjective, invasive and have long diagnostic windows. Raman spectroscopy provides a non-destructive, non-invasive, rapid and economical method for diagnosing diseases. The aim of this study was to investigate the use of Raman and immersion Raman spectroscopy for diagnosing metastatic brain cancer and identifying primary sites of origin using brain tissue. Through spectral examination, the Raman peaks at 721 cm-1 and 782 cm -1 were identified as being the most distinct for discriminating between the glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), metastatic and normal brain tissue spectra. A ratio score plot of these peaks calculated the classification sensitivities and specificities as 100% and 94.44% for GBM, 96.55% and 100% for metastatic brain, and 85.71% and 100% for normal brain tissue. Principal Component-Linear Discriminant Analysis (PC-LDA) also showed discrimination between normal, GBM and metastatic brain tissue spectra. We also present, for the first time, the use of Raman spectroscopy to investigate primary site of origin for metastatic brain cancer and any biochemical differences between different primary and metastatic cancer using linked samples. This study revealed interesting spectral differences in the amide regions showing changes in the biochemistry of the metastatic brain cancer from the primary cancer.

LanguageEnglish
Pages3948-3961
Number of pages14
JournalAnalytical Methods
Volume6
Issue number12
Early online date8 Jan 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Jun 2014

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Raman spectroscopy
Brain
Tissue
Biochemistry
Discriminant analysis
Amides

Keywords

  • brain cancer
  • immersion Raman spectroscopy
  • metastatic brain tissue spectra

Cite this

Fullwood, Leanne M. ; Clemens, Graeme ; Griffiths, Dave ; Ashton, Katherine ; Dawson, Timothy P. ; Lea, Robert W. ; Davis, Charles ; Bonnier, Franck ; Byrne, Hugh J. ; Baker, Matthew J. / Investigating the use of Raman and immersion Raman spectroscopy for spectral histopathology of metastatic brain cancer and primary sites of origin. In: Analytical Methods. 2014 ; Vol. 6, No. 12. pp. 3948-3961.
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Fullwood, LM, Clemens, G, Griffiths, D, Ashton, K, Dawson, TP, Lea, RW, Davis, C, Bonnier, F, Byrne, HJ & Baker, MJ 2014, 'Investigating the use of Raman and immersion Raman spectroscopy for spectral histopathology of metastatic brain cancer and primary sites of origin' Analytical Methods, vol. 6, no. 12, pp. 3948-3961. https://doi.org/10.1039/c3ay42190b

Investigating the use of Raman and immersion Raman spectroscopy for spectral histopathology of metastatic brain cancer and primary sites of origin. / Fullwood, Leanne M.; Clemens, Graeme; Griffiths, Dave; Ashton, Katherine; Dawson, Timothy P.; Lea, Robert W.; Davis, Charles; Bonnier, Franck; Byrne, Hugh J.; Baker, Matthew J.

In: Analytical Methods, Vol. 6, No. 12, 21.06.2014, p. 3948-3961.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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